Tag: Waynett

MEET THE PEOPLE WHO GRIND OUT THE BEST MOVIE TRAILERS IN THE

first_imgAdvertisement Every artistic endeavor considered beautiful or haunting or mind-altering or maybe just cool was most likely a grind. Someone had to give Michelangelo notes on the Sistine Chapel. The same goes for movie masterpieces. Producers do math, directors herd attractive human cattle, actors tediously memorize words. Movie trailers, the lauded first glimpse of something that culminates decades of eager fanboy angst, aren’t much different.In 2005, two days after getting my undergraduate degree in film, I walked into Los Angeles’s Trailer Park, then housed in a little brick three-story building at Hollywood Boulevard and Ivar Avenue, a stone’s throw from where film legends press their palms into the concrete outside Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. (Trailer Park now stands directly across the street from the theater, a glowing motor lodge sign on top.) I had no experience and no ego—just a car. So I was tasked with driving freshly edited copies of shiny new trailers to marketing execs around L.A., an often dangerous, thankless job that technology has effectively eradicated.Trailer Park was a buzzing hive of weird, funny, angry, often stoned people—most deeply talented—who banded together for about 20 hours a day to somehow perfectly encapsulate two-hour films into two minutes and 30 seconds (and then 60 seconds, 30, 15, whatever your wandering mind has time for). There were teams of editors and assistant editors, pacing producers and nebbish writers, graphics folks and sound engineers. And lowly runners. Sometimes Tom Cruise would ride up in a blacked-out Ford Excursion to pick at cheese plates and stand over an editor’s shoulder as she cut new versions of a Mission: Impossible III trailer. This is the grind. Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Twitter No one was happier to see me than Jeff Gritton, then a towheaded 22-year-old runner who was getting the call to move upstairs and become an assistant editor. Now 35, you’ve almost certainly seen Gritton’s masterworks—he helped create the trailers for many of Pixar’s recent films, including stitching together an award-winning spot for Up and the theatrical trailer for last year’s Coco.“Sometimes we’ll start on a trailer before they’ve even started filming,” Gritton says. “We just break down the script. Then we’ll get dailies—literally everything they’ve shot, hours and hours.” The dailies are covered in ghostly watermarks and stamped with the producer’s and house’s name for security’s sake, making them nearly unwatchable and of no real use to pirates. Theoretically.last_img read more

Start reading MEET THE PEOPLE WHO GRIND OUT THE BEST MOVIE TRAILERS IN THE