Tag: 上海夜网JY

Colombia Wages Successful Battle against Kidnapping

first_imgThe Army and the National Police deserve much of the credit for reducing kidnappings throughout the country, according to Yadira Gálvez, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). They include new laws that increase penalties for kidnapping; programs to enhance public awareness and citizen cooperation in reporting kidnappings; increased resources for courts and prosecutors to prosecute kidnappers; and increased government control of rural areas by security forces to deny organized kidnapping groups freedom of movement, among other factors. In 2000, a reported 3,572 people were kidnapped, or almost ten people per day, according to statistics from by the Anti-Kidnapping and Anti-Extortion Directorate of the Colombian National Police. Praise for the Army and National Police Another dramatic change in the nature of kidnapping in Colombia is that victims are being rescued or released much more quickly than in the past. In recent years, however, common criminals are believed to have been responsible for about 75 percent of all kidnappings in Colombia. Meanwhile, guerrilla groups such as the FARC, which has officially sworn off kidnapping as a tactic, are blamed for only about 23 percent of the cases. Kidnapping victims rescued and released Fewer abductions by terrorist groups According to the report, one key element in the battle against kidnapping was the creation of elite, highly-trained, anti-kidnapping teams known as Unified Action Groups for Personal Freedom, or GAULAs in Spanish. Regardless of which they fall under, all GAULA groups are elite units whose personnel have received extensive training in both urban and rural combat, crisis management, weapons training, specialized instruction for snipers and breachers, raids, detention methods, and intelligence-gathering. Praise for the Army and National Police In addition to the sharp decline in the number of kidnappings, statistics show that the nature of kidnapping in Colombia has changed dramatically over the past one-and-a-half decades. They include new laws that increase penalties for kidnapping; programs to enhance public awareness and citizen cooperation in reporting kidnappings; increased resources for courts and prosecutors to prosecute kidnappers; and increased government control of rural areas by security forces to deny organized kidnapping groups freedom of movement, among other factors. GAULAs are a key component of anti-kidnapping strategy First created in 1996, GAULA units now amount to 33 operational units in Colombia. Sixteen of those are under Army command, while another two are under Navy command, together comprising about 1,200 officers. Another 15 GAULA units are under the command of the National Police. Both Military and National Police units are under the overall command of the Ministry of Defense. Cooperative efforts by the Colombian National Army, National Police, and civilian agencies have reduced kidnappings in Colombia by more than 90 percent over the past 14 years, according to statistics compiled by the nation’s anti-kidnapping agency. Still, most of the GAULA units’ work involves ordinary people who have fallen victim to kidnappers. For example, in December, 2014, an Army GAULA unit assisted by Army Troops launched an operation to rescue a local prosecutor who had been kidnapped by unknown assailants in Cauca Department. Given the pressure from the GAULA operation, the kidnappers released their victim unharmed the next day. Kidnapping victims rescued and released Regardless of which they fall under, all GAULA groups are elite units whose personnel have received extensive training in both urban and rural combat, crisis management, weapons training, specialized instruction for snipers and breachers, raids, detention methods, and intelligence-gathering. In 2000, a reported 3,572 people were kidnapped, or almost ten people per day, according to statistics from by the Anti-Kidnapping and Anti-Extortion Directorate of the Colombian National Police. By Dialogo February 16, 2015 GAULAs are a key component of anti-kidnapping strategy In 2000, kidnapping victims were routinely held in captivity for years. In 2014, however, about 190 kidnapping victims — more than half the annual total — were held hostage for 30 days or less, with the majority of them held for only one or two days. The Army and the National Police deserve much of the credit for reducing kidnappings throughout the country, according to Yadira Gálvez, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Colombia’s successful fight against kidnapping is attributable to a number of factors, according to a report on personal freedom between 2011-2014 by the Colombian Ministry of Defense. In another recent incident in November, 2014, GAULA troops rescued a 74-year-old agricultural engineer who had been kidnapped in the northern Department of Tolima by common criminals who demanded a large ransom. Acting on intelligence from local residents, the GAULA troops found the victim unharmed in two days. In 2014, however, the annual number of kidnappings for ransom or political/terrorist purposes dropped to below 300, the directorate reported, a figure that has remained roughly constant over the past three years. In 2000, kidnapping victims were routinely held in captivity for years. In 2014, however, about 190 kidnapping victims — more than half the annual total — were held hostage for 30 days or less, with the majority of them held for only one or two days. Colombia’s successful fight against kidnapping is attributable to a number of factors, according to a report on personal freedom between 2011-2014 by the Colombian Ministry of Defense. In recent years, however, common criminals are believed to have been responsible for about 75 percent of all kidnappings in Colombia. Meanwhile, guerrilla groups such as the FARC, which has officially sworn off kidnapping as a tactic, are blamed for only about 23 percent of the cases. In addition to the sharp decline in the number of kidnappings, statistics show that the nature of kidnapping in Colombia has changed dramatically over the past one-and-a-half decades. But the GAULAs’ successes against kidnappers have not come without cost. Since 2005, GAULA units have lost 28 officers killed in the line of duty. Cooperative efforts by the Colombian National Army, National Police, and civilian agencies have reduced kidnappings in Colombia by more than 90 percent over the past 14 years, according to statistics compiled by the nation’s anti-kidnapping agency. In 2014, however, the annual number of kidnappings for ransom or political/terrorist purposes dropped to below 300, the directorate reported, a figure that has remained roughly constant over the past three years. In 2000, anti-government terrorist groups such the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN) were responsible for the majority of the nation’s kidnappings, often setting up roadblocks in rural areas and kidnapping people en masse. “This remarkable change in the reduction of kidnapping in Colombia is very important, it is a result of the increasingly strong presence of security forces of both the National Police and the Army,” in areas where the FARC, the ELN, and other illegal groups have been active, Gálvez said. Fewer abductions by terrorist groups In 2000, anti-government terrorist groups such the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN) were responsible for the majority of the nation’s kidnappings, often setting up roadblocks in rural areas and kidnapping people en masse. First created in 1996, GAULA units now amount to 33 operational units in Colombia. Sixteen of those are under Army command, while another two are under Navy command, together comprising about 1,200 officers. Another 15 GAULA units are under the command of the National Police. Both Military and National Police units are under the overall command of the Ministry of Defense. According to the report, one key element in the battle against kidnapping was the creation of elite, highly-trained, anti-kidnapping teams known as Unified Action Groups for Personal Freedom, or GAULAs in Spanish. Still, most of the GAULA units’ work involves ordinary people who have fallen victim to kidnappers. For example, in December, 2014, an Army GAULA unit assisted by Army Troops launched an operation to rescue a local prosecutor who had been kidnapped by unknown assailants in Cauca Department. Given the pressure from the GAULA operation, the kidnappers released their victim unharmed the next day. In another recent incident in November, 2014, GAULA troops rescued a 74-year-old agricultural engineer who had been kidnapped in the northern Department of Tolima by common criminals who demanded a large ransom. Acting on intelligence from local residents, the GAULA troops found the victim unharmed in two days. In all, GAULA units rescued or assisted in the rescues of 84 kidnapping victims in 2014, according to the anti-kidnapping directorate, while almost 600 kidnappers were apprehended. Another 133 kidnapped victims were released by their captors, 16 died in captivity, 11 were freed under pressure from security forces and nine escaped on their own, according to Ministry of Defense statistics. Although Military and National Police GAULA units work closely together, the Military GAULA units generally operate in remote, rugged, and rural areas, while National Police GAULA units generally do so in metropolitan areas. But both Military and police GAULA officers work closely with the Prosecutor General’s Office and the Administrative Department of Security (DAS). Another dramatic change in the nature of kidnapping in Colombia is that victims are being rescued or released much more quickly than in the past. In all, GAULA units rescued or assisted in the rescues of 84 kidnapping victims in 2014, according to the anti-kidnapping directorate, while almost 600 kidnappers were apprehended. Another 133 kidnapped victims were released by their captors, 16 died in captivity, 11 were freed under pressure from security forces and nine escaped on their own, according to Ministry of Defense statistics. Although Military and National Police GAULA units work closely together, the Military GAULA units generally operate in remote, rugged, and rural areas, while National Police GAULA units generally do so in metropolitan areas. But both Military and police GAULA officers work closely with the Prosecutor General’s Office and the Administrative Department of Security (DAS). But the GAULAs’ successes against kidnappers have not come without cost. Since 2005, GAULA units have lost 28 officers killed in the line of duty. “This remarkable change in the reduction of kidnapping in Colombia is very important, it is a result of the increasingly strong presence of security forces of both the National Police and the Army,” in areas where the FARC, the ELN, and other illegal groups have been active, Gálvez said.last_img read more

Start reading Colombia Wages Successful Battle against Kidnapping

Investing in the ecosystem

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr At Visa, trust, security and reliability are fundamental to everything we do. As a leading payments technology company, we take seriously our responsibility to maintain the global ecosystem and continually improve capabilities that enable individuals, businesses and economies to thrive.This is an undertaking that has grown more complex and challenging in recent years. As commerce has moved increasingly online, the opportunity for fraud and cyber threats has grown. At the same time, fraud rates have remained near-historic lows, at less than one-tenth of one percent for the past two decades. And while Visa’s processing volumes have nearly doubled over the last 5 years,[1] VisaNet, our core authorization platform, has consistently performed at 99.999 percent reliability.[2]To manage the constantly changing threat environment and growing demands on our infrastructure, we devote significant resources to our talent and technology. Over the last five years, we’ve invested nearly $9B in enhancing and securing our core technology platforms and launching new products and capabilities for our clients, partners and employees.[3] These investments include:World-Class Technology Platform: At the heart of Visa lies a technology infrastructure that powers more than 138 billion payments annually[4], each in just a few milliseconds. This platform consists of hundreds of software applications, a massive fleet of best-in-class hardware, highly resilient data centers, and a vast telecommunications network spanning more than 10 million route miles[5]. Each of these components is wrapped in multiple security technologies and backed by numerous redundant layers, so if one component fails, another kicks in to ensure continuous processing.last_img read more

Start reading Investing in the ecosystem

Endicott Fire Department receives $2,500 from FEMA

first_imgThe congressman also acknowledged the funds are coming at a difficult time, when many local goverments are looking at budget cuts brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Brindisi said the money can be used for things like new equipment, PPE, and other necessary items to help first responders continue to protect the community they serve. ENDICOTT (WBNG) — Congressman Anthony Brindisi announced the Endicott Fire Department received more than $2,500 in funding from FEMA’s assistance to firefighters grant program. “It’s really important to get as many federal dollars into the community as possible to help make up for those losses that may be coming from the state, and to make sure that we’re keeping the first responders safe and able to do the job.” Brindisi told 12 News. The congressman says it is critical for leaders to be there for services like fire departments. He emphasized his office is always looking to help departments secure grant funding.last_img read more

Start reading Endicott Fire Department receives $2,500 from FEMA

One game is in the books; rest are slated for tomorrow

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Late Friday evening, there is still no telling what this weekend has in store. Of the Sumner County teams which chose to play tonight, only the West Elk-Oxford game was completed.West Elk beat Oxford 68-22.Here is what we have as far as football games.Caldwell at Argonia-Attica has been rescheduled until 5 p.m. Saturday.Conway Springs led Wichita Independent 14-6 at the half. They will resume play at 6 p.m. Saturday.There is no word on South Haven at Flinthills.There is also still no word on the Wellington Cross Country Invitational. But it isn’t looking good!Remember, Wellington is scheduled to play at El Dorado at noon tomorrow at BG Stadium.The box score for the Oxford-West Elk is as follows: West Elk  14   32  22  X   68Oxford      8    14   0   X   221st QuarterOxford Vaughn 27 yard TD Run, Silhan PAT.WE Miller 20 yard TD run, Miller PAT.WE Miller 4 yard TD run, PAT Fail.2nd quarterWE Vandergrift 54 yard TD, VAndergrift PAT.Oxford Vaughn 64 yard TD run, PAT Fail.WE Silvy 30 yard TD run, Vandergrift PAT.Oxford Vaughn 79 yard Kickoff return TD, PAT fail.WE Vandergrift 50 yard TD run, Miller PAT.WE Vandergrift 19 yard TD run, Vandergrift PAT.3rd quarterWE Miller to Cannon 60 yard TD pass, PAT Vandergrift.WE Miler 55 yard TD run, PAT Miller.WE Miller 25 yard TD run.Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Start reading One game is in the books; rest are slated for tomorrow