Tag: 上海品茶网论坛

Colombia Wages Successful Battle against Kidnapping

first_imgThe Army and the National Police deserve much of the credit for reducing kidnappings throughout the country, according to Yadira Gálvez, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). They include new laws that increase penalties for kidnapping; programs to enhance public awareness and citizen cooperation in reporting kidnappings; increased resources for courts and prosecutors to prosecute kidnappers; and increased government control of rural areas by security forces to deny organized kidnapping groups freedom of movement, among other factors. In 2000, a reported 3,572 people were kidnapped, or almost ten people per day, according to statistics from by the Anti-Kidnapping and Anti-Extortion Directorate of the Colombian National Police. Praise for the Army and National Police Another dramatic change in the nature of kidnapping in Colombia is that victims are being rescued or released much more quickly than in the past. In recent years, however, common criminals are believed to have been responsible for about 75 percent of all kidnappings in Colombia. Meanwhile, guerrilla groups such as the FARC, which has officially sworn off kidnapping as a tactic, are blamed for only about 23 percent of the cases. Kidnapping victims rescued and released Fewer abductions by terrorist groups According to the report, one key element in the battle against kidnapping was the creation of elite, highly-trained, anti-kidnapping teams known as Unified Action Groups for Personal Freedom, or GAULAs in Spanish. Regardless of which they fall under, all GAULA groups are elite units whose personnel have received extensive training in both urban and rural combat, crisis management, weapons training, specialized instruction for snipers and breachers, raids, detention methods, and intelligence-gathering. Praise for the Army and National Police In addition to the sharp decline in the number of kidnappings, statistics show that the nature of kidnapping in Colombia has changed dramatically over the past one-and-a-half decades. They include new laws that increase penalties for kidnapping; programs to enhance public awareness and citizen cooperation in reporting kidnappings; increased resources for courts and prosecutors to prosecute kidnappers; and increased government control of rural areas by security forces to deny organized kidnapping groups freedom of movement, among other factors. GAULAs are a key component of anti-kidnapping strategy First created in 1996, GAULA units now amount to 33 operational units in Colombia. Sixteen of those are under Army command, while another two are under Navy command, together comprising about 1,200 officers. Another 15 GAULA units are under the command of the National Police. Both Military and National Police units are under the overall command of the Ministry of Defense. Cooperative efforts by the Colombian National Army, National Police, and civilian agencies have reduced kidnappings in Colombia by more than 90 percent over the past 14 years, according to statistics compiled by the nation’s anti-kidnapping agency. Still, most of the GAULA units’ work involves ordinary people who have fallen victim to kidnappers. For example, in December, 2014, an Army GAULA unit assisted by Army Troops launched an operation to rescue a local prosecutor who had been kidnapped by unknown assailants in Cauca Department. Given the pressure from the GAULA operation, the kidnappers released their victim unharmed the next day. Kidnapping victims rescued and released Regardless of which they fall under, all GAULA groups are elite units whose personnel have received extensive training in both urban and rural combat, crisis management, weapons training, specialized instruction for snipers and breachers, raids, detention methods, and intelligence-gathering. In 2000, a reported 3,572 people were kidnapped, or almost ten people per day, according to statistics from by the Anti-Kidnapping and Anti-Extortion Directorate of the Colombian National Police. By Dialogo February 16, 2015 GAULAs are a key component of anti-kidnapping strategy In 2000, kidnapping victims were routinely held in captivity for years. In 2014, however, about 190 kidnapping victims — more than half the annual total — were held hostage for 30 days or less, with the majority of them held for only one or two days. The Army and the National Police deserve much of the credit for reducing kidnappings throughout the country, according to Yadira Gálvez, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Colombia’s successful fight against kidnapping is attributable to a number of factors, according to a report on personal freedom between 2011-2014 by the Colombian Ministry of Defense. In another recent incident in November, 2014, GAULA troops rescued a 74-year-old agricultural engineer who had been kidnapped in the northern Department of Tolima by common criminals who demanded a large ransom. Acting on intelligence from local residents, the GAULA troops found the victim unharmed in two days. In 2014, however, the annual number of kidnappings for ransom or political/terrorist purposes dropped to below 300, the directorate reported, a figure that has remained roughly constant over the past three years. In 2000, kidnapping victims were routinely held in captivity for years. In 2014, however, about 190 kidnapping victims — more than half the annual total — were held hostage for 30 days or less, with the majority of them held for only one or two days. Colombia’s successful fight against kidnapping is attributable to a number of factors, according to a report on personal freedom between 2011-2014 by the Colombian Ministry of Defense. In recent years, however, common criminals are believed to have been responsible for about 75 percent of all kidnappings in Colombia. Meanwhile, guerrilla groups such as the FARC, which has officially sworn off kidnapping as a tactic, are blamed for only about 23 percent of the cases. In addition to the sharp decline in the number of kidnappings, statistics show that the nature of kidnapping in Colombia has changed dramatically over the past one-and-a-half decades. But the GAULAs’ successes against kidnappers have not come without cost. Since 2005, GAULA units have lost 28 officers killed in the line of duty. Cooperative efforts by the Colombian National Army, National Police, and civilian agencies have reduced kidnappings in Colombia by more than 90 percent over the past 14 years, according to statistics compiled by the nation’s anti-kidnapping agency. In 2014, however, the annual number of kidnappings for ransom or political/terrorist purposes dropped to below 300, the directorate reported, a figure that has remained roughly constant over the past three years. In 2000, anti-government terrorist groups such the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN) were responsible for the majority of the nation’s kidnappings, often setting up roadblocks in rural areas and kidnapping people en masse. “This remarkable change in the reduction of kidnapping in Colombia is very important, it is a result of the increasingly strong presence of security forces of both the National Police and the Army,” in areas where the FARC, the ELN, and other illegal groups have been active, Gálvez said. Fewer abductions by terrorist groups In 2000, anti-government terrorist groups such the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN) were responsible for the majority of the nation’s kidnappings, often setting up roadblocks in rural areas and kidnapping people en masse. First created in 1996, GAULA units now amount to 33 operational units in Colombia. Sixteen of those are under Army command, while another two are under Navy command, together comprising about 1,200 officers. Another 15 GAULA units are under the command of the National Police. Both Military and National Police units are under the overall command of the Ministry of Defense. According to the report, one key element in the battle against kidnapping was the creation of elite, highly-trained, anti-kidnapping teams known as Unified Action Groups for Personal Freedom, or GAULAs in Spanish. Still, most of the GAULA units’ work involves ordinary people who have fallen victim to kidnappers. For example, in December, 2014, an Army GAULA unit assisted by Army Troops launched an operation to rescue a local prosecutor who had been kidnapped by unknown assailants in Cauca Department. Given the pressure from the GAULA operation, the kidnappers released their victim unharmed the next day. In another recent incident in November, 2014, GAULA troops rescued a 74-year-old agricultural engineer who had been kidnapped in the northern Department of Tolima by common criminals who demanded a large ransom. Acting on intelligence from local residents, the GAULA troops found the victim unharmed in two days. In all, GAULA units rescued or assisted in the rescues of 84 kidnapping victims in 2014, according to the anti-kidnapping directorate, while almost 600 kidnappers were apprehended. Another 133 kidnapped victims were released by their captors, 16 died in captivity, 11 were freed under pressure from security forces and nine escaped on their own, according to Ministry of Defense statistics. Although Military and National Police GAULA units work closely together, the Military GAULA units generally operate in remote, rugged, and rural areas, while National Police GAULA units generally do so in metropolitan areas. But both Military and police GAULA officers work closely with the Prosecutor General’s Office and the Administrative Department of Security (DAS). Another dramatic change in the nature of kidnapping in Colombia is that victims are being rescued or released much more quickly than in the past. In all, GAULA units rescued or assisted in the rescues of 84 kidnapping victims in 2014, according to the anti-kidnapping directorate, while almost 600 kidnappers were apprehended. Another 133 kidnapped victims were released by their captors, 16 died in captivity, 11 were freed under pressure from security forces and nine escaped on their own, according to Ministry of Defense statistics. Although Military and National Police GAULA units work closely together, the Military GAULA units generally operate in remote, rugged, and rural areas, while National Police GAULA units generally do so in metropolitan areas. But both Military and police GAULA officers work closely with the Prosecutor General’s Office and the Administrative Department of Security (DAS). But the GAULAs’ successes against kidnappers have not come without cost. Since 2005, GAULA units have lost 28 officers killed in the line of duty. “This remarkable change in the reduction of kidnapping in Colombia is very important, it is a result of the increasingly strong presence of security forces of both the National Police and the Army,” in areas where the FARC, the ELN, and other illegal groups have been active, Gálvez said.last_img read more

Start reading Colombia Wages Successful Battle against Kidnapping

Gladson Awako speaks on failed moves to Europe after winning U-20 World Cup [VIDEO]

first_imgAccra Great Olympics midfielder, Gladson Awako, has expressed his disappointment on failed attempts to joining top European clubs early in his career.The midfielder was a part of Sellas Tetteh’s U-20 squad that won both the African Nations Cup and the FIFA World Cup in 2009 although not featuring much for the team.The 29-year-old revealed in an interview on Pulse Ghana that he had chances to play for clubs like Tottenham Hotspurs, Inter Milan, AS Monaco among others but the moves did not happen.“I am disappointed because I had chances to travel outside to train with some European clubs like Tottenham, Inter Milan, Monaco, but it didn’t happen the way I wished. However, I still moved on and I believe that things will get better,” He told Pulse GhanaAwako added that much is expected of players at the U-20 level by clubs.“It is different from playing in the U-17 team. It is the U-20 so those clubs out there have some expectations because you are already mature. If you are playing for the U-20 you have already hit 18, 19, 20 years of age so you should be a matured player. They have some target that they want to see from the player”. He added.Gladson Awako after the U-20 World Cup in Egypt moved to the Spanish side, Real Club Recreativo de Huelva in 2010 but soon returned to the Ghana Premier League to play for Kpando Hearts of Lions.After a year Hearts of Lions, he moved to Berekum Chelsea where he won the Ghana Premier League in 2011 and reached the group stages of the CAF Champions League in 2012.After excelling on the domestic scene, he joined TP Mazembe in 2012.He returned to the Ghana Premier League in 2019 after a spell with Phoenix Rising Star in the United States.Watch the interview here:last_img read more

Start reading Gladson Awako speaks on failed moves to Europe after winning U-20 World Cup [VIDEO]