Month: June 2021

Lions 2013: 5 things we learned from Lions v Barbarians

first_imgThe commercial reasons for playing in Hong Kong were understandable – playing rugby in 37 degree heat and 84% humidity was not. The humidity’s impact on handling was disastrous. We saw spiral passes dropping two feet short of the receiver and even if the sweat soaked ball made it to the target, it was difficult to catch and then readjust for the following pass. I’m amazed the coaches didn’t encourage their players to align closer and throw end-on-end passes rather than spiral ball flights – much easier to handle. The humidity also had an impact on the scrum. Binding on a modern jersey is a lottery at the best of times. Add 2mm of sweat to the shirt and binding onto an international tight head is like trying to take hold of an elephant seal that’s just been for a swim – in olive oil. Hong Kong is great for sevens. Maybe they should stick to the shorter format. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Leading the way: Mike Phillips scored two tries for the Lions in their opening match versus the BarbariansBy Paul Williams Promising startTHE 2013 British and Irish Lions made a very efficient start to their tour with an eight try, 59-8 victory. The Lions dominated every aspect of the game. They secured 67% of the possession and a devastating 72% of the territory – if they had secured any more territory in Hong Kong it may have constituted an ‘invasion’ under UN protocols. The glut of possession meant that the Lions strike runners broke the line at will – Mike Phillips and Jamie Roberts, in particular, made five clean breaks and beat eight defenders between them – more than the Barbarians squad combined. The Lions also completed 93% of their tackles – an impressive stat when you consider that the Lions defensive line has never played together before. Of course all of these positives need to be taken in context. The Baabaas once again fell short of the standards expected from this phoney-Test match – having 25 defenders beaten in 80 minutes is a concern at any level. The Barbarians’ ethos for the professional era may need a rethink.Solid: Mako Vunipola held his own at the set-pieceThe basic platforms look solid, alreadyThe Lions performance wasn’t perfect. It was never going to be. At best the players have known each other 21 days. Issues with ball retention, handling errors and passing accuracy are to be expected at this early stage. The real positives came in the set piece. The Lions scrum was impressive. The first half combination of Adam Jones, Richard Hibbard and Mako Vunipola demolished the Baabaas – overall the Lions scrum yielded five penalties and two free-kicks. The Lions lineout ran at a very respectable 85%, missing just two from thirteen – the use of Dan Lydiate at the tail in particular providing ultra-fast ball. It’s worth noting Gatland’s use of a six at the tail of the lineout – he usually prefers to lift a lighter open-side. Many have stated that the Lions learned nothing of value in Hong Kong. However, learning that your group of 37 strangers have already knitted together a solid set piece is highly valuable.Senior Lions led the way There were some impressive debutante performances in Hong Kong. Justin Tipuric, Toby Faletau, Stuart Hogg, Jon Davies and Richie Gray all enhanced their reputations. Faletau and Tipuric broke the mould of Lions back-rows of the recent past who have tended towards force rather than finesse. However, whilst the new boys played well, two 2009 veterans excelled – Mike Phillips and Jamie Roberts played at the level required by the Lions. Robert’s powerful ‘inners’ through the 12 channel caused havoc and his marshalling of the defensive line and kick chase was authoritative. Mike Phillips was back to his unplayable best. His carrying in the narrow channels and his ‘arc’ through the midfield caused the Barbarians massive problems – again, reminiscent of 2009. It’s worth highlighting that Phillips’ pass didn’t come under scrutiny in Hong Kong. Handling was tricky for everyone and thus the speed of his pass wasn’t an issue. That won’t be the case against the Wallabies.Too early to lambast Owen FarrellOwen Farrell’s performance was below that required by the Lions. His passing accuracy was poor, his loss of composure with Schalk Brits was unsettling and his cheering of the subsequent yellow card was not becoming of a British and Irish Lion. However, the playing conditions in Hong Kong were dreadful. Whilst it is true that the ‘conditions are the same for everyone’ – they affect outside-halves more than anyone else. Other than the scrum-half, the ten completes more passes than any other player. They are responsible for the majority of tactical kicking, goal kicking and launching all of the backs moves. Any adverse conditions magnify their mistakes tenfold. I’m not suggesting that Farrell will start the Test matches; but let’s not crucify him after what is tantamount to a quick knock about in Hong Kong.Sweatbox: Barbarian Duncan Jones feels the heatToo hot for rugby HONG KONG – JUNE 01: Duncan Jones of the Barbarians takes a drink after the match between the British & Irish Lions and the Barbarians at Hong Kong Stadium on June 1, 2013, Hong Kong. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) last_img read more

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Lions 2013: It’s all just a little case of history repeating

first_img8 Jun 2001: Jeremy Paul and Chris Latham and other Wallaby teamates share a laugh during a team photograph at the Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney, Australia. Mandatory Credit: Adam Pretty/ALLSPORT Unlike today’s team, more than a few Wallaby players were allowed to play the Lions in the lead-in, but the team itself played almost no rugby with one game against the New Zealand Maori just a day after the Lions’ first game ended 41-29 in their favour. Also, while it was not until the second Test, the Wallabies also decided to hand out free gold scarves to combat the overwhelming red that hit them in the opening game. This year the Wallabies are getting their retaliation in early, handing out free gold safari hats at all three Test venues.Joker: Chris Latham and teammates fool around in 2001However, it is in personnel changes and Test selection that there could be more than a few omens before the 2013 series starts.In 2001 an in-form centre was awarded a spot alongside Brian O’Driscoll after another player in his position limped out with injury, as Rob Henderson was assured a spot with Will Greenwood suffering a damaged ankle ligament. A full-back you could set your watch by was given a starter’s jersey, with Matt Perry the only real candidate for selection.There was also room on the wing for a man who had benefited from a previously-impressive colleague getting hurt, with Dafydd James picking up after Dan Luger was hobbled, and a winger who was turning Wallaby pockets inside-out, as Jason Robinson broke out much like George North has and hopefully will continue to do.On the opposite side of the ball, Australia picked a maverick full-back few had expected to see, with Chris Latham selected ahead of the ever-reliable Matt Burke. There were a few interesting swaps and a new cap in the front five, but that day there were several experienced performers and tactical choices, with Nathan Grey starting at inside centre ahead of proven helmsman Elton Flatley. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Looking for a little comfort: Warren Gatland cuts a lonely figure as he leaves the pitch after losing to the BrumbiesBy Alan DymockHEADING TOWARDS the first Test, the British and Irish Lions have an encouraging win against the Waratahs and a lacklustre loss against the Brumbies as inspiration for the first shot at the Wallabies.The loss will unsettle Warren Gatland like a dodgy shrimp off the barbie, but it was a limp performance from a quickly-assembled team boasting a handful of players likely to feature in the first Test. It was an afterthought of a game with an underperforming pack, but Gatland will be thankful there were no more injuries.Beneficiary: Rob Henderson in the first Wallaby Test, 2001Did it affect the Lions’ chances on Saturday at the Suncorp? No, even though it was another swift kick in the lower-pelt for some in the pride.History has shown that a loss can help motivate tourists heading into a first Test. It happened in 2001 and, in fact, there are more than a few parallels to be drawn between this tour and the trip 12 years ago, before the big one in Queensland.In 2001 the Lions had a number of injuries before the opening Test of the series, with winger Tyrone Howe, centre Scott Gibbs, hooker Gordon Bulloch and flankers Martin Corry and David Wallace all playing a part coming into the Gabba.The team had a loss before hand, being downed 28-25 by Australia ‘A’. After that game head coach Graham Henry bemoaned the team’s clumsy shuffling at the lineouts, saying: “Our lineout was not acceptable. We lacked basic sharpnessand a lot of negatives came out of the game. We need to put some more time into our lineout work, which needs to be quality time. …Reality has really set in.”The build-up by the Wallabies that year also had some tiny similarities with the 2013 incarnation. That day the Wallabies were overwhelmed.It would perhaps be indecorous to suggest that history will repeat itself or that the knocks the Lions have experience will actually make them stronger. Gatland does not seem the type to pick teams because of omens or place his faith in signs, but he has picked in a similar vain as Graham Henry heading into that first test.last_img read more

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RW picks England’s 31-man squad

first_img It’s a standard split of 17 forwards and 14 backs and the selected players come from a spread of Aviva Premiership clubs. Saracens and Bath have made the largest contributions; just under half of the final squad.ForwardsLancaster named three hookers: Jamie George, Rob Webber and Tom Youngs. Banned Dylan Hartley has not been included, but Lancaster refused to rule out a return to the squad in the event of injury.As expected, Dan Cole will be the lynchpin of the front row, one of seven players in the team with World Cup experience. He is joined by David Wilson, Joe Marler and Mako Vunipola. Northampton Saint Kieran Brookes is the least experienced prop in the squad, but has shown promise in the 2014 autumn Internationals and 2015 Six Nations.Courtney Lawes, Geoff Parling, Joe Launchbury and George Kruis were named in the second row.As expected: England Captain Chris Robshaw and James Haskell make it The final 31-man England squad revealed on 27 August is a young one. With an average age of 26, only three of the squad have over 50 England caps. Seven of the selected men have accrued ten or less caps for their country. By Taylor Heyman LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Captain Chris Robshaw and James Haskell were no surprises in the back row. Billy Vunipola and Tom Wood secured their places with good performances in the run-up.Ben Morgan edged out Nick Easter, securing his place with a solid return to form following his broken leg earlier in the season. Dave Attwood and Calum Clarke also missed out.BacksScrum-half choices were as expected; Danny Care, Ben Youngs and Richard Wigglesworth offer Lancaster good options.England scrum-halves: Danny Care, Ben Youngs and Richard WigglesworthOwen Farrell and George Ford were selected as expected at fly-half, with Henry Slade offering another option. His ability to play well at both ten and 12 have given him the edge in selection.Joining Slade in the centres are Brad Barritt, Jonathan Joseph and Sam Burgess.Without doubt the biggest upset in the selection was Luther Burrell being dropped in favour of Sam Burgess, the ex-league player with one international cap. So how does this squad compare with the lineup Rugby World predicted? Find out who we would have picked on the next page.center_img First World Cup: Sam Burgess and Anthony WatsonCompetition for the back three was intense. Mike Brown, Alex Goode, Jonny May, Jack Nowell and Anthony Watson were selected. Danny Cipriani lost out to Alex Goode, who like Cipriani, can play at fly-half if needed.England’s 31-man squadProps: Kieran Brookes (Northampton Saints, 10 caps), Dan Cole (Leicester Tigers, 51 caps), Joe Marler (Harlequins, 32 caps), Mako Vunipola (Saracens, 22 caps), David Wilson (Bath Rugby, 43 caps)Hookers: Jamie George (Saracens, 1 cap), Rob Webber (Bath Rugby, 13 caps)Tom Youngs (Leicester Tigers, 23 caps)Second Rows: George Kruis (Saracens, 8 caps), Joe Launchbury (Wasps, 23 caps), Courtney Lawes (Northampton Saints, 39 caps), Geoff Parling (Exeter Chiefs, 24 caps)Back Rows: James Haskell (Wasps, 60 caps), Ben Morgan (Gloucester Rugby, 28 caps), Chris Robshaw (captain, Harlequins, 38 caps), Billy Vunipola (Saracens, 18 caps), Tom Wood (Northampton Saints, 37 caps)Scrum-halves: Danny Care (Harlequins, 52 caps), Richard Wigglesworth (Saracens, 22 caps), Ben Youngs (Leicester Tigers, 48 caps)Fly-halves: Owen Farrell (Saracens, 30 caps), George Ford (Bath Rugby, 12 caps)Centres: Brad Barritt (Saracens, 22 caps), Sam Burgess (Bath Rugby, 1 cap), Jonathan Joseph (Bath Rugby, 12 caps), Henry Slade (Exeter Chiefs, 1 cap)Back Three: Mike Brown, (Harlequins, 38 caps), Alex Goode (Saracens, 18 caps), Jonny May (Gloucester Rugby, 15 caps), Jack Nowell (Exeter Chiefs, 9 caps), Anthony Watson (Bath Rugby, 10 caps) England’s 39-man squad at their last training session before Lancaster’s final selection 1. Introduction2. Rugby World’s predicted England Squad 2015Page 1 of 2 – Show Full ListIntroductionRugby World’s predicted England Squad 2015last_img read more

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Emily Scarratt

first_img TAGS: The Greatest Players The only current international player on our list, Emily Scarratt makes the grade as one of the most influential Test players in a generation.Many will remember Scarratt best as the player who grabbed the 2014 World Cup final by the scruff of the neck with a dazzling try and accurate kicking display in a 16-point performance worthy of a player who has lit up the game since she was a teenager.Those who have watched the English game in recent years will pick Scarratt out as a star in almost every match. Pace, strength and footwork are her hallmark but it’s her ability to ghost through a gap that has drawn comparisons with Brian O’Driscoll and, in recent years, her unique kicking style with Jonny Wilkinson.Since the World Cup, where she finished as the top point-scorer, Scarratt has become a professional player, one of the group of English players who are playing rugby for a living as full-time sevens athletes. Major teams: LichfieldPosition: CentreCountry: EnglandTest span: 2008- LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Heralded by England captain Katy Mclean, a fellow former teacher, as a “phenomenal, world-class talent”, Scarratt is part of the GB women’s sevens outfit for the 2016 Olympics in Rio.And rugby is lucky to have her. The rangy and athletic centre turned down a US basketball scholarship aged 16 before making her international debut in 2008 and scoring 12 tries in 12 games having come through the age-group ranks. She won the Rugby Union Writers’ Club Pat Marshall Memorial Award as the sport’s personality of the year for 2014 as well as the RPA England Women’s Players’ Player in 2013. She will be adding to her list of achievements, with plenty of time left in the game.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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British & Irish Lions secure Vodafone sponsorship deal

first_img“At a time when connection, unity and community are more important than ever, the Lions 2021 Tour gives us a great opportunity to bring people together in a way that no other sporting event can. The build up to this incredible touring event starts now. It’s time to unite the pride.”There has been a flurry of news about the famous touring side in recent weeks.Last week, Sky agreed a deal for the exclusive TV rights to broadcast its seventh successive Lions tour. It has also been anounced that a behind-the-scenes documentary, taking viewers into both the Lions and Springboks camps throughout the series, is planned for the upcoming tour. It will be the first Lions film shot from the perspectives of both sides.Lions supporters can also now pre-register for the official ballot for tickets for each of the three Tests against South Africa in 2021, via the offical Lions site. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. British & Irish Lions secure Vodafone sponsorship deal Despite global uncertainty over major sporting events, the British & Irish Lions have secure a significant sponsorship deal with Vodafone, ahead next summer’s tour of South Africa. The mobile phone company will be lead partner and shirt sponsor of next summer’s tour to face the world champion Boks, replacing Standard Life who were major sponsors for the tour of New Zealand in 2017.The Lions confirmed earlier this month that the tour would proceed as planned in July and August 2021. Max Taylor, Commercial Director, Vodafone said of the deal: “Nothing in sport unites us quite like the Lions. The team bonds nations that normally compete, unites families and friends and brings generations closer together.Related: Exclusive interview with Lions boss Warren Gatlandcenter_img The mobile company will be lead partner and shirt sponsor for South Africa tour In the famous jersey: The Lions in New Zealand, 2017 (Getty Images) last_img read more

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Best deals on Six Nations kits

first_imgIreland recently signed a new long-term deal with Canterbury, who they have been with since 2016, and marked the occasion by revealing the brand new home jersey that the men in green will wear this year.The shirt features a striking black and green pattern across the body, which is said to represent “strength, power and unity” and continues the trend of recent Irish jerseys being some of the most bold and unconventional in the Test arena.Buy now from Canterbury for £70Macron Wales 2020/21 Home ReplicaImage: Rugby Store+ Dragon motif and hexagonal pattern just like pro shirt+ WRU ‘shield’ badge just like test jerseys+ Relaxed fit compared to test designFor 2020/21, Wales ended their 12-year association with Under Armour over the summer, and have switched to Italian brand Macron in a seven-year deal.The new shirt drew comparisons with Liverpool’s current home shirt, but that hasn’t stopped fans proclaiming it one of the nicest Wales shirts in years – beware Macron’s cycling jersey-inspired sizing, however, you’ll almost certainly want to size up a bit from your normal kit size.Buy from Lovell Rugby for £65Buy now from JD Sports for £70Le Coq Sportif France 2020/21 Replica HomeImage: Pro:Direct Rugby+ Retro FFR logo+ Two-tone effect+ Tricolore touchesFrance’s stylish 2020/21 home jersey comes straight from French sporting institution Le Coq Sportif, and the brand certainly has a different take on rugby shirt design than many other suppliers. Note the interesting two-fabric approach giving the shirt its two-tone effect for example.It’s also unbelievably stylish, from the subtle tricolore striping that runs down one sleeve, the diagonal stitching down the side vents, or indeed that gloriously retro FFR crest, this certainly stands out from the crowd.Falling at the final hurdle in 2020 in both the Six Nations and Autumn Nations Cup, Les Bleus will be hoping to dispel some demons from this kit in 2021.Buy now from Pro:Direct Rugby for £72Macron Italy 2020/21 Home ShirtImage: Rugby Store+ Tonal pinstriped pattern+ Unique collar design+ Subtle Italian flag motifs throughoutThe Azzuri continually sport some of the best-looking jerseys in all of rugby and their 2020/21 jersey is no exception, with this classic light blue number accented with white and subtle Italian flag touches on the back of the jersey and on the collar.The shirt also features a striking and unique collar design, and a rather lovely, subtle double-pinstriped pattern that runs through the front and back of the design. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Where to find the best deals on the kits that all Six Nations teams will be wearing in the 2021 championship Best deals on Six Nations kits for 2021 center_img Best Deals on Six Nations KitsThe 2021 championship sees an array of jerseys that were released for last year’s Autumn Nations Cup by each nation’s respective manufacturer. Support your nation from home with the best stash each nation has to offer as they fight it out for glory across February and March.There are loads of different types and styles of jerseys to choose from for every nation, but here you’ll find our pick of the best deals available on all Six Nations kits for the 2021 championship. We’ve made decisions easy by providing you with this definitive guide.Best Deals on Six Nations KitsUmbro England 150th Anniversary Rugby ShirtImage: Umbro+ Retro style+ Different design to the regular England 2020/21 kit so offers something different+ Clean design with O2 logo moved to the sleeveEngland kick off their campaign at Twickenham against Scotland on Saturday 6 February in the Calcutta Cup. To celebrate 150 years since the first ever fixture was played between the two nations, Umbro have created an anniversary shirt that will be worn on a one-off occasion.The 02 logo has moved to the sleeve to create design on the front of the jersey. The rose is also larger and in a different style to the one currently seen on the England kit.Buy now from Umbro for £70Umbro England 2020/21 Replica HomeImage: England Rugby Store+ Looks very similar to version worn by the pros+ Looser fit for comfort+ Multi-layered tonal pattern adds depth to classic England lookAfter seven years with rugby mainstay Canterbury, England jumped ship to British kit supplier Umbro for the Autumn internationals – Umbro has a long history with rugby, having supplied various test teams in the 70s and 80s, including the British & Irish Lions.The first England shirt Umbro have designed, Six Nations and Autumn Nations Cup glory heralded in the first England shirt Umbro designed at the back of 2020, with Owen Farrell and co aiming for a repeat of their success in the same shirt. This shirt is similar to what the national team will be wearing, right down to the multi-layered tonal pattern of the body fabric.Buy now from Umbro for £56Buy now from England Rugby Store for £56Buy now from Lovell Rugby for £56Macron Scotland 2020/21 Replica HomeImage: Rugby Store+ Gold touches celebrate first international match+ Tartan pattern on lower back+ Modern take on classic collarMacron and Scotland have been together since 2013, and in that time the brand has provided the men in blue with some of the most ‘classic’ looking test designs that we’ve seen in many a year, and the 2020/21 version is no exception.With a classic fold-over collar reinvented for the modern era and the classic blend of blue and white, it could be a shirt from a bygone age, and that’s with good reason – the flashes of gold on sleeves and collar placket are there to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first ever international rugby match, which was held between England and Scotland in 1871.Buy now from Pro:Direct Rugby for £70Buy now from JD Sports for £70Canterbury Ireland Pro HomeImage: Canterbury+ 3D Injection Moulded IRFU crest+ Vapodri fabric offers excellent moisture wicking+ Stretch collar for improved comfort Buy from JD Sports for £70Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Please follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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La ‘carnicería’ de la violencia armada debe cesar, dicen los…

first_img Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest La ‘carnicería’ de la violencia armada debe cesar, dicen los obispos El retiro concluye con un llamado a un ‘nuevo diálogo que desafíe la violencia de las armas de fuego en EE.UU. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY [Episcopal News Service] Diciendo que “lamentan los asesinatos en masa ampliamente divulgados” en Estados Unidos y que “han llorado por su causa”, la Cámara de Obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal declaró también el 12 de marzo que [los obispos] estaban “escandalizados por las masacres diarias de nuestros jóvenes que pasan inadvertidas en ciudades tales como Chicago, Newark, Baltimore, Puerto Príncipe y Tegucigalpa”.“Esta carnicería debe cesar, dijeron los obispos en una “Palabra a la Iglesia” expedida desde el Centro de Conferencias de Kanuga en Hendersonville, Carolina del Norte (Diócesis de Carolina del Norte Occidental) al final de su reunión del 8 al 12 de marzo.Los obispos dijeron que ellos “encarnan una amplia variedad de experiencias y perspectivas respecto a las armas de fuego” contándose entre ellos “cazadores y tiradores deportivos, [así como] ex miembros de las fuerzas armadas y ex agentes de los servicios de orden público”.“Respetamos y honramos el no ser unánimes en lo que respecta a los asuntos relacionados con la legislación sobre las armas. No obstante, estamos convencidos de que debe haber un nuevo diálogo en Estados Unidos que desafíe la violencia de las armas de fuego”, afirmaron. “Debido a la amplia variedad de contextos en que vivimos y nuestro compromiso con un discurso razonado y respetuoso que integre importantes diferencias en tensión creativa, creemos que la Iglesia Episcopal puede y debe llevar adelante este empeño. De hecho muchos en esta Iglesia ya lo están haciendo, por lo cual damos gracias a Dios”.Un compromiso específico “a liderar un nuevo diálogo en nuestras naciones en cuanto al uso adecuado y la legislación de las armas de fuego” y a tomar “medidas específicas para este fin”, es, dijeron los obispos, acorde con sus votos de ordenación episcopal de “proclamar e interpretar valerosamente el Evangelio de Cristo, iluminando las mentes y despertando las conciencias”.También dijeron que todos los episcopales son llamados también “a orar y laborar por el fin de la violencia armada”.El tema para la reunión de los obispos, definido como un retiro, fue “un liderazgo piadoso en medio de la pérdida” y las sesiones incluyeron oración, estudio bíblico diario, reflexión y culto.Algunos obispos vieron inicialmente el tema como “deprimente”, dijo Todd Ousley, obispo de la Diócesis de Michigan Oriental y vicepresidente del comité de planificación de la Cámara, durante una sesión informativa de prensa al final de la reunión. Ese sentimiento cambió en la medida en que las reflexiones de varios obispos fueron ampliando el tema, afirmó.“Sin ninguna coordinación entre esos obispos, realmente abordaron las mismas cosas”, agregó Ousley refiriéndose específicamente al llamado a los obispos “a estar presentes; hemos de estar conectados en relaciones y en eso realmente es que consiste el liderazgo”.La reunión [de la Cámara de Obispos] fue la primera desde la Convención General en julio de 2012, y la primera reunión de los obispos fuera del marco de la Convención desde su último retiro en marzo de 2010. Los obispos por lo general se reúnen en marzo y en septiembre en los años en que no sesiona la Convención General.Un total de 137 obispos se inscribieron para participar en el retiro, según informara Ken Price, obispo sufragáneo jubilado de Ohio que es el secretario de la Cámara. Once de los obispos eran nuevos desde el último retiro, dijo Price, quien también resaltó en la sesión informativa el fallecimiento de ocho obispos.“La Cámara se mantiene en un flujo continuo, pero en los 18 años que yo he estado asistiendo, puedo decir sinceramente que esta reunión dio más espacio, más tiempo para ocuparnos de nosotros mismos que ninguna otra”. Refiriéndose al formato de retiro, Price dijo: “creo que todos nos vamos a ir refrescados y agradecidos por el período de reflexión”.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori se hizo eco de ese sentir, calificando la reunión como un tiempo de “genuina fraternidad y de diálogo profundo” y describió la sesión vespertina del 12 de marzo como “la más mínima reunión de negocios que puedo recordar”.“Nos dedicamos al negocio de ocuparnos de nuestras almas y eso es una gran bendición”, dijo ella durante la sesión informativa.Mientras los obispos se encontraban reunidos, se anunció que se había llegado a un acuerdo y que había sido aceptado por Jefferts Schori sobre las denuncias del Comité Permanente de la Diócesis de Quincy contra los obispos Peter Beckwith (Springfield), Bruce MacPherson (Luisiana Occidental) y Edward Salmon (Carolina del Sur), y del Comité Permanente y de un individuo de la Diócesis de Fort Worth contra los obispos Maurice Benítez (Dallas), John Howe (Florida Central), Paul Lambert (Dallas), William Love (Albany), Daniel Martins (Springfield), Edward Salmon (Carolina del Sur), y James Stanton (Dallas).El “proceso de conciliación” descrito también como un proceso de mediación, tuvo lugar en conformidad con el Título IV.10 de los Cánones de la Iglesia.“’Conciliación’ es una palabra grotescamente inadecuada para describir lo que ha sucedido”, escribió Martins después de darse a conocer el acuerdo el 8 de marzo. “Hoy creo que es más prudente decir que nosotros nueve estamos procesando algún grado de indignación y que nos sentimos sustancialmente alienados de los que presentaron los cargos contra nosotros. Nos sentimos manipulados y victimizados. No estamos en modo alguno contentos con este resultado, aunque nos atenemos a nuestra decisión de aceptar el acuerdo”.Martins, que asistió al retiro en Kanuga, también calificó el tono del acuerdo como “irónico y hostil” y “ofensivo”.Al preguntarle si el acuerdo y la reacción de Martins habían salido a relucir durante el retiro, Ousley dijo que el tono de la reunión “fue de la de estar muy atentos a nuestras relaciones a lo largo de todo el espectro”.Dijo que se habían suscitado unas “preguntas mínimas” cuando se le informó del acuerdo a la Cámara. “Nuestra atención no estaba en eso, sino más bien en lo mucho que valoramos nuestras mutuas relaciones y en que todos hemos experimentado pérdidas” cuando algunos miembros de la Iglesia Episcopal han decidido abandonarla.La reunión conllevó muchísimas conversaciones informales entre los obispos, dijo Dean Wolfe, obispo de Kansas, durante la sesión informativa, añadiendo que él no había percibido los sentimientos que Martins le atribuye a los obispos involucrados en el proceso. “Hubo muchísimo buen humor, buena conversación y la sensación de que avanzamos y no estamos mirando hacia atrás”, afirmó.Jefferts Schori resaltó que el proceso de conciliación se incluye en el Título IV de los cánones disciplinarios de la Iglesia y que “es un paso hacia la reconciliación; no logra la plena reconciliación, pero es un paso en esa dirección”.La Oficina de Relaciones Públicas de la Iglesia Episcopal publicó partes diarios que ofrecían un breve recuento de las discusiones y actividades de los obispos en Kanuga. Esos partes pueden encontrarse aquí.Al público y los medios de prensa no se les permitió presenciar las sesiones. Algunos obispos hicieron comentarios en sus blogs o en Twitter durante el retiro.Entre los que enviaron mensajes en Twitter, valiéndose de los números temáticos #HOB2013 y #HOB13, estuvieron los obispos Greg Brewer, de la Diócesis de Florida Central; Marrian Budde, de la Diócesis de Washington; Tom Ely, de la Diócesis de Vermont; Andy Doyle, de la Diócesis de Texas; Ian Douglas, de la Diócesis de Connecticut; Jeff W. Fisher, sufragáneo de la  Diócesis de Texas; Rob Hirschfeld, de la  Diócesis de Nuevo Hampshire; Steve Lane, de la Diócesis de Maine; Nick Knisely, de la Diócesis de Rhode Island; Dan Martins, de la Diócesis de Springfield; Kirk Smith de la Diócesis de Arizona: Jake Owensby, de la Diócesis de Luisiana Occidental  y Robert Wright, de la Diócesis de Atlanta, quien hizo notar que Knisely le había advertido que debía comenzar a enviar mensajes por Twitter.En reuniones anteriores, algunos obispos han argüido problemas de confidencialidad en respuesta a los mensajes de sus colegas sobre sus conversaciones a través de blogs o de Twitter. Wolfe dijo durante la sesión informativa de prensa que los obispos habían estado de acuerdo en no publicar porciones confidenciales de sus reuniones. En otros partes de la reunión “disfrutamos de una serie de normas más laxas”, apuntó.“Es importante que se disponga de algún momento en que los obispos sientan que pueden compartir de manera creativa y abierta sin el temor de que sus palabras se transmitan al mundo”, dijo Wolfe.Price convino en que “necesitamos esos momentos en que sencillamente conversamos unos con otros”, pero “por otra parte, cuando en verdad sí queremos comunicar, disponemos de montones de instrumentos para hacerlo realmente efectivo y ponernos al día con el mundo”.Él hizo notar que muchos de los obispos recientes “son más jóvenes y han estado usando varios tipos de redes sociales con mucha familiaridad durante mucho tiempo”. Añadió que en una reunión informal algunos de esos obispos estuvieron enseñándoles a otros la manera de usar más efectivamente esas redes sociales.Ousley dijo que el acuerdo de los obispos pide también el valerse de las redes sociales “fundamentalmente para informar nuestras propias palabras y nuestras propias impresiones, en lugar de palabras provenientes de otros”.Los mensajes de Twitter que aparecieron con el número temático #HOB2013, el que más se usó de los dos, pueden encontrarse aquí.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 center_img Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 14, 2013 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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Turning from fear to prayer: Archbishop of Canterbury in Auckland

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By Taonga staffPosted Aug 14, 2014 Archbishop of Canterbury Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Turning from fear to prayer: Archbishop of Canterbury in Auckland Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Photos of the Archbishop of Canterbury’s visit to Auckland, New Zealand, are available here.[Anglican Taonga] More than 400 Kiwi Anglicans crammed into Auckland’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre last evening to see and hear The Archbishop of Canterbury, The Most Rev Justin Welby, during his racing stopover in New Zealand.Archbishop Welby, who is in New Zealand for just 24 hours, preached on a night when the beautifully-restored 135-year old wooden Gothic Revival church creaked and shuddered like a Spanish galleon in the teeth of a late winter blast.He’d spent the afternoon with the three Archbishops of this province, and their wives, talking about the challenges facing the communion – they’d touched on everything from slavery to the persecution of Christians in strife-torn places like Iraq and northern Nigeria, he said – and he’d learned something about the life of the church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.Archbishop Welby told journalists after the service that “the most challenging thing for me… has been hearing about the extraordinarily radical way in which the Anglican Church in New Zealand is structuring itself to represent its communities.“Giving integrity to each one, yet being woven together as one – and it’s a real blessing for the rest of the Anglican communion.”The evening service itself bore out what Archbishop Welby had earlier been told by the local archbishops – with hymns and Bible readings in Maori, English, Samoan and Tongan, and performances by Pacific Island choirs and action songs by a Maori kapa haka troup.Archbishop Welby told the journalists that he was well familiar with multicultural settings – but not with the degree of interweaving he’d just seen at Holy Sep: “It’s much more bound together here,” he said. “There seems to be a really deliberate sense to it, which is very exciting.The absurdity, the insanity of the cross…Archbishop Welby drew his sermon from the texts for the evening – Psalm 72, Proverbs 8: 22-31 and John 19: 23-27 – reflecting on the impulse to fear in the world, and the overcoming of that fear that is the Christian’s birthright.He acknowledged too, that this is the bicentenary year for the church in Aotearoa New Zealand.“Even after 200 years of the gospel,” he said, “it is good to remember the absurdity, the insanity of the cross.“In John’s gospel the cross is the place of exaltation, of triumph. John himself says that that was only clear to the disciples after the resurrection.“For everyone else apart from Jesus, the spectacle, the sight of a man on the cross led them to get Jesus wrong.“For the soldiers, playing dice at the foot of the cross, the error was to see nothing out of the ordinary.“The world is being saved around them. By this figure, at whose feet they gamble.“And they gamble… to make the most of a dull day.“The disciples, those who have not run away, huddle in despair, and anguish and defeat. Their error is only to see their crucified rabbi.“They do not see triumph. The throne of the cross.“The world passed on its way, that day, as it would every other day – and as probably we would have done, if we’d been going into Jerusalem on that day.“Across the Holy Land, the dying died, the suffering suffered, all over the world. Many other deaths happened, unremarked, that day. And this day was much unremarked, among those who were there.“And yet only this one death made human history, made cosmic history, completely different.“And the challenge for us as the family, that was created through and after that event – God’s family – is to be the sort of people who enable the mistakes that were made then, and are still made today to be set right, so that the light may shine.“Because for Christians, all our actions should be governed by this figure. And by the way of his death.“A figure on the cross. By the empty tomb. By the gift of the spirit of God – by our vocation to be Christ in this troubled, and for many, this terrible world.A world propelled to fear“This evening, the appalling events of Iraq, the equally terrible killings in Northern Nigeria and in Syria, the war in the Ukraine, and in so many other parts of the world…“The seemingly endless repetitions of the terrible tragedies of Gaza and the whole of Israel and Palestine… all these events and movements propel the world towards fear.“And fear takes people to self-protection, and self-protection takes people to actions that only make things worse.“There must of course be actions. We are an active people.“Christians are called by God to serve, to transform.“Yet the pattern of our action is set by the figure on the cross.“There are millions of reasons for fear. There’s probably about six and a half billion in this world at the moment – and they are every single human being.“We look at human sin and violence, and that gives us reason to fear.“We look at natural disasters – and you know so much more than we do about that – and we see millions and billions of reasons for fear.“Against those millions and billions, there is only one reason for courage, for hope – and that is God.“The God of cross and resurrection.“And that one reason overwhelms every other reason for fear.” Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anglican Communion, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

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#ShareTheJourney pilgrimage begins in Kenya

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Africa, Rector Tampa, FL Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Advocacy Peace & Justice, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Refugees Migration & Resettlement Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC On March 4, Anglican Bishop Joel Waweru of the Diocese of Nairobi welcomed the #ShareTheJourney pilgrims to Kenya, and offered a brief overview of the Anglican Church of Kenya. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Nairobi, Kenya] Eight #ShareTheJourney pilgrims arrived in Nairobi March 3 for an 11-day pilgrimage to Kenya and Rwanda to learn about the plight of Congolese refugees and the process they go through to gain resettlement in the United States.“What I hope the result of this trip will be is an increased understanding of what a unique and special program Episcopal Migration Ministries is in The Episcopal Church, and that more Episcopalians can see a place for themselves in this life-saving ministry,” said Deborah Stein, director of Episcopal Migration Ministries, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s refugee resettlement service that is leading the pilgrimage.(The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business, and carries out mission.)In addition to meeting with nongovernmental organizations, including the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and Church World Service’s Africa Resettlement Support Center, the pilgrims will travel to Rwanda to visit the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre and the Gihembe Refugee Camp.The pilgrimage is part of Episcopal Migration Ministries yearlong, 75th anniversary #ShareTheJourney campaign to raise awareness of the ways the Missionary Society works to facilitate refugee resettlement throughout The Episcopal Church.“I think Episcopal Migration Ministries is one of the most inspiring and least well-known ministries in The Episcopal Church,” said the Rev. Scott Gunn, one of the pilgrims and executive director of Forward Movement, a Cincinnati, Ohio-based ministry of The Episcopal Church that encourages discipleship. “I’m eager to see transformation in my own life as I experience this pilgrimage, and I want to do whatever I can to share this journey with other people.”Through Episcopal Migration Ministries, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society partners with 30 resettlement affiliates in 26 dioceses nationwide. It is one of nine agencies working in partnership with the U.S. Department of State to welcome and resettle refugees to the United States.In 2014, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society worked with partners to resettle 5,155 of the tens of thousands of refugees who came to the United States through UNHCR’s screening process.Over the next several years, UNHCR plans to resettle 50,000 refugees from the Congo, with 70 to 90 percent to be resettled to the United States.Since 1998, more than 5.5 million people have died in the Congo from fighting, disease and malnutrition in what is regarded as the deadliest conflict since World War II. About 2.5 million people have been internally displaced, and some 500,000 have fled the country’s protracted conflict, with the vast majority living in refugee camps in the Great Lakes and Horn of Africa regions.“There’s no other durable solution for this group of refugees, who’ve been waiting for over a decade in refugee camps without hope of a future,” said Stein. “Some have been resettled or have found a way to stay in the country of asylum, but the rest are languishing away in camps. Resettlement is the only option for them.”A refugee is someone who has fled his or her country of nationality because of a “well-founded fear of persecution” based on race, religion, ethnicity, or political or social affiliation.There are 15.5 million refugees worldwide, according to the UNHCR, whose mandate is to provide international protection for refugees. The agency’s primary focus is on repatriation, or safe return home, followed by citizenship or legal residency in the host country. The third option is resettlement to one of the 22 countries worldwide that accepts refugees. One percent receives third-country resettlement, with half of that 1 percent destined for the United States.The resettlement process typically takes years; refugees can spend decades living in camps before their cases are heard and adjudicated. Kenya is one of two countries – the other being Ethiopia – that hosts the largest number of refugees living in camps in Africa.“One of the effects of resettlement is that it’s a show of support for countries hosting refugees; it gives breathing space to host countries to continue to keep their borders open to future refugees and asylum seekers,” said Stein. “The Congolese refugees are just one of many groups awaiting a similar durable solution.”The #ShareTheJourney pilgrimage is funded through a Constable Fund grant awarded in 2014 by The Episcopal Church Executive Council. The Constable Fund provides grants to fund mission initiatives that were not provided for within the budget of The Episcopal Church passed by the General Convention.Follow the pilgrims at #ShareTheJourney on Twitter (@EMMRefugees); Facebook here; the blog here; or through the media hub here.– Lynette Wilson is an Episcopal News Service editor and reporter. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 5, 2015 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release #ShareTheJourney pilgrimage begins in Kenya Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries, Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Anglican Communion, last_img read more

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Foro episcopal crea conciencia sobre la crisis del cambio climático

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Environment & Climate Change Submit a Job Listing Foro episcopal crea conciencia sobre la crisis del cambio climático El evento del 24 de marzo pone en marcha ’30 días de acción’ Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Por Lynette Wilson Posted Mar 30, 2015 Rector Washington, DC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls El Rvdmo. Marc Andrus, obispo de California y defensor del medioambiente durante mucho tiempo, y Mary D. Nichols, que preside la Junta de Recursos Aéreos de la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de California, hablan, en un panel moderado por Fritz Coleman, un meteorólogo local, acerca de recuperar el cambio climático como un problema moral. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Los Ángeles, California] En un país profundamente politizado, en el que a los funcionarios medioambientales de la Florida se les ha prohibido usar juntas las palabras “clima” y “cambio” en una misma oración, y donde un candidato presidencial descarta la noción de que los gases de efecto invernadero están causando que la atmósfera de la tierra se caliente, la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS, por su sigla en inglés) auspició un foro el 24 de marzo para abordar la crisis del cambio climático mundial.“¿Por qué llamamos a esto una crisis? El sistema regulatorio del planeta está siendo alterado”, dijo la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori, durante su discurso de apertura que se transmitió en directo por un foro en la red.“Al igual que los seres humanos con una fiebre descontrolada, el malfuncionamiento del termostato le causa a un cuerpo una lenta autodestrucción, según la inflamación afecta las articulaciones, da lugar a que fallen las células nerviosas e impide que el sistema digestivo absorba los nutrientes básicos de la vida. Este planeta está recalentándose, su clima está cambiando y sus habitantes se enferman, padecen y mueren”, prosiguió.Cerca de 75 personas se reunieron en el auditorio de la Escuela Episcopal de Campbell Hall, en Studio City, Diócesis de Los Ángeles, para el foro sobre la crisis del cambio climático presentado por la DFMS en asociación con el obispo de Los Ángeles J. Jon Bruno. Además del discurso de la Obispa Primada, el foro de 90 minutos de duración incluyó paneles dedicados a los impactos regionales del cambio climático y a recuperar el cambio climático como un problema moral.Moderado por Fritz Coleman, climatólogo del noticiero de televisión del canal KNBC 4, entre los panelistas se contaron el obispo Marc Andrus, de la Diócesis de California; Princess Daazhraii Johnson, ex directora ejecutiva del Comité Directivo Gwich’in, una de las agrupaciones indígenas sin fines de lucro más antiguas de Alaska, dedicada a la protección del Refugio Nacional de la Vida Salvaje del Ártico; Lucy Jones, sismóloga del Departamento de Topografía Geológica de EE.UU. e investigadora visitante asociada al Laboratorio de Sismología del Instituto Tecnológico de California; y Mary D. Nichols, que preside la Junta de Recursos Aéreos de la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de California.Además, el evento puso en marcha una campaña interactiva de 30 días diseñada por la DFMS que incluye jornadas de promoción, boletines informativos, relatos y actividades para comprometer a individuos y congregaciones en torno al [tema del] cambio climático. Los 30 días de acción concluirán el Día de la Tierra, el 22 de abril.“El cambio climático nos afecta grandemente a todos aquí en Los Ángeles: estamos en un lugar donde los granjeros abandonan sus cultivos y les venden su ración de agua a otras personas”, dijo Bruno, al explicar una de las razones por la cual su diócesis auspició el foro del 24 de marzo.El evento se produjo al tiempo que California entra en un cuarto año de sequía —las acumulaciones de nieve han disminuido y el agua subterránea ha descendido a niveles históricos en algunas zonas— mientras que en la costa oriental del país las nevadas y las temperaturas heladas por debajo de lo normal alcanzaban cifras récord.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori pronuncia su discurso de apertura en el Foro sobre la Crisis Climática el 24 de marzo en Los Ángeles. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.“El clima es una amplia descripción de la variabilidad del tiempo y las condiciones ambientales. Estamos experimentando fenómenos climáticos más extremos y huracanes, tornados, inundaciones y sequías con mayor frecuencia”, dijo Jefferts Schori. “El nivel del mar está subiendo, porque las capas de hielo se derriten y porque un océano más cálido se expande. En la medida en que aumenta el nivel del mar, las inundaciones costeras resultan más probables y las tormentas intensas más destructivas. Los daños hechos por [el huracán] Katrina y la supertormenta Sandy son dos ejemplos, como lo es también el invierno inusual que gran parte de esta continente está experimentando”.Una “crisis” por definición, dijo Fritz Coleman, el moderador, es un problema o un peligro intenso, un momento crítico en la historia, un momento en el cual deben tomarse decisiones”.El cambio climático, prosiguió él, es el cambio gradual en la temperatura global causado por acumulación de gases de efecto invernadero que atrapan el calor en la atmósfera y, en consecuencia, alteran la temperatura de la tierra. Algunas zonas se tornan más cálidas, así como otras se hacen más frías, explicó él, que es la razón por la cual “cambio climático”, no “calentamiento global”, es el término preferido.“Estos cambios están causando multitud de trastornos peligrosos en nuestro mundo —alterando los patrones del clima, [provocando] inundaciones, sequías, un aumento de las tormentas violentas y enfermedades— y afectando ampliamente los ecosistemas de la tierra”, dijo Coleman. “Y he aquí la idea fundamental, el impacto del cambio climático no es sólo al medioambiente, sino que también tendrá un intenso impacto económico, como es el de notables escaseces de alimento y de agua. La conclusión es que, sin la reducción de estos gases de efecto invernadero, nuestro planeta enfrenta un serio peligro en el siglo XXI”.Lucy Jones, la sismóloga que sirve como asesora científica en la misión para la reducción de riesgos de amenazas naturales del Departamento de Topografía Geológica de EE.UU. y quien ha dedicado su carrera a estudiar desastres sísmicos y cómo estos alteran la sociedad, explicó durante el panel sobre impacto regional cómo había pasado la última década valiéndose de la ciencia de los riesgos para buscar los modos de mejorar la resistencia de una comunidad a los desastres naturales.“La misma primera predicción del cambio climático es un aumento de los fenómenos extremos; cuando uno pone más energía en la atmósfera, hay más energía para crear tormentas que retengan el agua”, dijo Jones, miembro de la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [St. James] en Pasadena del Sur, California.Fue hace 20 años, durante una reunión, que Jones oyó hablar por primera vez de cambio climático; en ese tiempo se predijo un aumento en los desastres naturales, que resultó cierto.“Las pérdidas que se espera provengan de los desastres meteorológicos inducidos por el cambio climático empequeñecen todos los otros desastres que pudiéramos enfrentar”, dijo Jones. “Y si queremos ser resistentes, tenemos que ser resistentes a todo lo que la tierra nos trae. Y nuestras acciones a través del cambio climático han acrecentado esos desastres”.Lucy Jones, sismóloga del Departamento de Topografía Geológica de EE.UU. e investigadora visitante asociada del Laboratorio Sismológico del Instituto Tecnológico de California, y Princess Daazhraii Johnson, ex directora ejecutiva del Comité Directivo Gwich’in, conversan sobre los impactos regionales del cambio climático en un panel moderado por Fritz Coleman, meteorólogo local. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.En una zona costera propensa a la erosión o la inundación, por ejemplo, cuando encima de eso tiene lugar una gran tormenta o un incendio forestal, es cuando el sistema cambia, cuando las especies son barridas y el sistema ecológico no puede recuperarse, dijo ella.“De manera que vemos desastres y acontecimientos extremos como el mecanismo de los cambios significativos que van a ocurrir según el cambio climático cambia nuestro mundo”, dijo Jones.La población indígena de Alaska ya ha comenzado a experimentar importantes cambios en su ambiente natural, explicó Princess Daazhraii Johnson, quien creció en una aldea del Ártico, en el extremo sur del Refugio Nacional de la Vida Salvaje del Ártico.“El Ártico es uno de los lugares del planeta que se está entibiando más rápidamente en el planeta y estamos viendo derretirse las capas de hielo, nuestros glaciares están desapareciendo, la costra congelada se está derritiendo, la costa se está erosionando”, dijo Johnson. Ya tenemos a comunidades enteras que deben ser relocalizadas”.Alaska y el Ártico, subrayó ella, están experimentando los mismos cambios relacionados con el clima que otros lugares. “Pero la intensidad en que los estamos experimentando es muy grande, es masiva”.En enero, el presidente de EE.UU. Barack Obama prometió pedirle al Congreso que designara más de 4,5 millones de hectáreas, de las 7,6 millones que constituyen el Refugio Nacional de la Vida Salvaje del Ártico, como zona protegida. Si el Congreso lo aprueba, la zona se convertiría en la mayor zona virgen protegida desde la aprobación de la Ley de Tierras Vírgenes en 1964. Las comunidades religiosas le dieron las gracias a Obama por tomar medidas que “representan un paso decisivo en la protección de una parte sagrada de la creación de Dios, y le damos gracias por trabajar por salvaguardar este tesoro nacional”.La designación de zona virgen también protegería los derechos culturales y de subsistencia de los gwich’in [o kutchin], un pueblo indígena alaskeño que depende del caribú puercoespín del refugio para sobrevivir.La Iglesia Episcopal en su 77ª. Convención General en 2012 aprobó una legislación en la que decía “que estaba en solidaridad con esas comunidades que llevan el peso del cambio climático global”, entre ellas los pueblos indígenas y las personas marginadas y socialmente excluidas del mundo entero.Algunos de los cambios que han ocurrido en la tierra, dijo Jones, la sismóloga, no son reversibles y estamos viendo cambios en los patrones atmosféricos y oceánicos, pero en último término la sociedad debe hacer las preguntas correctas.“Usted reúne a un grupo de científicos y discutiremos entre nosotros… y es un momento clave cuando un grupo de científicos deja de discutir, y hemos dejado de discutir respecto a sí el cambio climático está ocurriendo”, dijo ella, añadiendo que discutirán sobre lo que es el ciclo del milenio versus lo que es actividad humana, pero estarán de acuerdo en que [el cambio climático] tiene lugar.Fuera de la comunidad investigadora, dijo también ella, la pregunta debería de ser: ¿las acciones que realizamos afectan?” Y la respuesta, dijo ella, es simple: “sí. Cuando prendes un fuego y cuando arrancas un auto, estás poniendo dióxido de carbono en la atmósfera… La población humana ha crecido exponencialmente y, por tanto, el número de personas que hacen eso ha aumentado exponencialmente”.Como dijera Jefferts Schori en su discurso de apertura: “los científicos han estado estudiando las repercusiones humanas en nuestra biosfera global durante décadas, y hoy existe un claro consenso acerca de los efectos de estos gases sobre la temperatura media del planeta. Hay unas pocas voces que insisten que esto es sólo una ‘variación natural’, pero los datos no mienten. Esas voces con frecuencia están motivadas por la codicia e intereses políticos personales, y a veces por obstinada ceguera.“La tradición judeocristiana siempre ha considerado pecaminosas esas motivaciones. Es decididamente erróneo utilizar recursos, que han sido dados a nuestro cuidado colectivo, de una manera que disminuya la capacidad de otros de participar de la vida abundante. Es igualmente erróneo dejar de usar los recursos de la memoria, la razón y el talento para discernir lo que está pasando en el mundo que nos rodea. Tradicionalmente eso se ha llamado pecado de omisión”.Pasando al segundo panel, Coleman preguntó por qué el cambio climático es un problema moral, a lo cual Mary D. Nichols, quien durante años ha trabajado sobre la calidad del aire y es miembro de la iglesia episcopal de Santiago en la Ciudad [St. James in the City] respondió: los seres humanos son la causa principal de los exagerados efectos que estamos viendo en nuestro planeta y por tanto nos incumbe asumir la responsabilidad de eso y tomar medidas.“Es un problema moral, creo yo, porque cuando pensamos en las cosas desde el punto de vista moral, eso tiende a sacarnos un poquito de nuestro elemento, y tenemos que trascender nuestro elemento cotidiano a fin de hacer algunas cosas que puedan parecer difíciles”.Si uno mira a cualquier tradición religiosa, añadió Nichols, cada una tiene un elemento que reconoce la humanidad como sujeta a Dios, no lo contrario.“En verdad, como episcopal yo puedo encontrar citas tocante a huertos y mayordomía y cosas por el estilo… y por tanto cuando hacemos algo que altera masivamente la creación de Dios, y el plan de Dios para nosotros, tenemos una obligación moral de hacer algo al respecto [para enmendarlo]”, afirmó ella. “Aunque esta manera de hablar incomode a algunas personas”.El evento, dijo Coleman, resultó muy prometedor, no sólo para la Iglesia Episcopal en su enfoque progresista, sino que en su discurso la Obispa Primada elevó [el nivel] del debate, de un debate religioso a un debate humano.“Creo que es maravilloso que la Iglesia Episcopal haya estado a la vanguardia de estos debates abiertos a todos en la Internet. Lo que resulta desconcertante es que, en general, todas las fes se hayan mostrado tan tímidas respecto a abordar este asunto, públicamente y hasta este punto”, afirmó él.Coleman especuló que podría ser porque los líderes religiosos mismos están inmersos también en la política.“Hemos estado alzando nuestra voz, la Iglesia Episcopal está trabajando arduamente”, dijo el obispo Marc Andrus, como resulta evidente de las medidas que se están tomando en la Diócesis de Los Ángeles respecto a la justicia alimentaria, y la participación de la Diócesis de California en Energía y Luz Interreligiosas, una coalición religiosa que hace campaña sobre el tema del cambio climático. “Pero la Iglesia perdió el gran púlpito en algún momento de los años sesenta [del pasado siglo] y muchísimas cosas cambiaron”.Pero, agregó él, hay alguna inmoralidad en esto y los medios de prensa se han visto involucrados.“Los medios tienen muchísimo que responder; están moldeando la historia”, dijo, citando a Chris Hayes, periodista de MSNBC, que dijo recientemente que es hora de dejar de decir que todo es equilibrado.Si alguien que niega el cambio climático aspira a un cargo político, en lugar de citar al 1 por ciento de los científicos que puede apoyar ese punto de vista, sería más preciso decir: “esta persona niega el cambio climático a pesar de las pruebas, y eso es lo que dice Chris”, expresó Andrus.“Y además, debemos contar con nuestra propia voz”, afirmó. “La iglesia no debe, en mi opinión, depender completamente o concederle la última palabra a personas a quienes les pagan por hacer anuncios publicitarios, sino más bien adquirir nuestra propia voz profética y divulgar nuestras propias historias”.Para más información sobre recuperar el cambio climático como un asunto moral, busque un artículo relacionado en la edición del 30 de marzo de Episcopal News Service, como parte de los 30 días de Acción.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. 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