Month: August 2019

Groundeffect planetrain flies inches above the ground w video

Groundeffect planetrain flies inches above the ground w video

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — By building a robotic ground-effect vehicle that flies inches above the ground, researchers from Japan may be offering a glimpse into the future of high-speed rail. The researchers, led by Yusuke Sugahara at Tohoku University, are currently testing the robotic prototype, which they have described earlier this week at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) in Shanghai. DARPA announces plans for self-piloted flying car More information: via: IEEE Spectrum As a ground-effect vehicle, the prototype uses the fast-moving air between the bottom of the vehicle and its track to fly above the ground. Usually, this air produces drag on planes as they’re landing, as well as on maglev trains, which levitate using electromagnets. But by taking advantage of this fast-moving air, the ground-effect vehicle can avoid the friction associated with rail contact, as well as avoid ground-effect drag.With its stubby wings, the ground-effect vehicle is controlled more like a plane than a train, since factors such as pitch, roll, and yaw need to be accounted for. The researchers are testing the prototype to better understand autonomous stabilization in a ground-effect vehicle.If the unmanned prototype works well, the researchers will develop a dynamic model of how ground-effect vehicles operate, and then use it to design and build a manned experimental prototype. Such a vehicle could travel at speeds of up to 200 kph (125 mph) around a U-shaped concrete channel.In the future, the researchers envision building a large commuter rail system that they call the Aero Train. Ideally, such a system would be less expensive and more efficient than today’s maglev trains. Explore further (Top) The robotic ground-effect vehicle is being tested by researchers at Tohoku University. (Bottom) Illustration of the Aero Train concept. Image credit: IEEE Spectrum. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Ground-effect ‘plane-train’ flies inches above the ground (w/ video) (2011, May 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-ground-effect-plane-train-flies-inches-ground.htmllast_img read more

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Low elevation forests finding it more difficult to regrow after fires due

Low elevation forests finding it more difficult to regrow after fires due

center_img Credit: CC0 Public Domain Explore further Citation: Low elevation forests finding it more difficult to regrow after fires due to climate change (2019, March 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-elevation-forests-difficult-regrow-due.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img

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The first observation of the nuclear Barnett effect

The first observation of the nuclear Barnett effect

first_img Explore further The electronic Barnett effect, first observed by Samuel Barnett in 1915, is the magnetization of an uncharged body as it is spun on its long axis. This is caused by a coupling between the angular momentum of the electronic spins and the rotation of the rod. The NMR technique employed by Arabgol and Sleator, called CPMG-Add, works by processing a series of very weak signals (or echoes). The resulting signal was strong enough to be easily detected by the researchers’ setup, to the point that the achieved rotational speeds changed it by a significant amount. “As far as I can say, the beauty of this experiment was not finding an extraordinary technique or utilizing a novel apparatus, but finding the very narrow combination of many parameters in the experiment and running the whole experiment with the highest level of care and awareness about the variety of available noises,” Arabgol said. “Our most interesting observation was that it is, in fact, possible to magnetize protons just by rotating a sample. That was quite exciting, since the electronic counterpart of this effect had been observed almost 100 years ago and we were not sure if it was possible to do the same thing for protons, especially seeing as the same effect is nearly 700 times smaller in protons compared to electrons.”Arabgol and Sleator were the first to magnetize protons, attaining a reliable observation of the nuclear Barnett effect. Another interesting aspect of their study is that the magnetization they observed has nothing to do with magnetic fields. This is particularly noteworthy, as researchers have so far typically magnetized objects by applying a magnetic field to them. The study carried out by Arabgol and Sleator, however, proves that there are, in fact, other mechanisms that can induce magnetization without necessarily creating a magnetic field. From a theoretical standpoint, these observations enhance the current understanding of the relationship between magnetization and rotation. From a practical standpoint, they could aid the development of ultra-low-frequency NMR systems by introducing a new technique for inducing magnetization that does not require magnets.”We conducted our experiment for liquids,” Arabgol said. “A very logical next step would be to validate the results for solids. Measuring the Barnett effect for solids would be much harder using the same technique. As we explained before, the effect is so small that only a very narrow combination of parameters eventually worked, and unfortunately, it is nearly impossible to find such a combination for solids. It is noteworthy, however, that ours is merely one approach to tackle this problem. Other techniques (e.g. SQUID-based methods) might be more promising.” © 2019 Science X Network Figure representing the main idea behind the experiment. Credit: Mohsen Arabgol. More information: Mohsen Arabgol et al. Observation of the Nuclear Barnett Effect, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.177202 Citation: The first observation of the nuclear Barnett effect (2019, May 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-nuclear-barnett-effect.html Laser-driven spin dynamics in ferrimagnets: How does the angular momentum flow? This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Using a different method from that employed by Barnett, two researchers at NYU observed an alternative version of this effect called the nuclear Barnett effect, which results from the magnetization of protons rather than electrons. Their study, published in Physical Review Letters (PRL), led to the first experimental observation of this effect. “I was a graduate student at NYU where a group of colleagues were involved in a project related to brain imaging,” Mohsen Arabgol, one of the researchers who carried out the study, told Phys.org. The fundamental idea behind the project was polarizing the brain molecules by inducing rotation using the Barnett effect and then applying the MRI-type imaging. I became interested and decided to work on the detection of the nuclear Barnett effect as my Ph.D. dissertation.”Initially, Arabgol and his supervisor Tycho Sleator wanted to drive rotation of the body used in their experiments by transferring the orbital angular momentum of light into the sample. They soon realized that this technique didn’t really work, and thus decided to employ a more promising method using a mechanical spinner to drive rotation.”The mechanical spinner allowed us to spin a larger sample of water up to speeds close to 15,000 revolutions per second, and finally, we were able to demonstrate the nuclear Barnett effect,” Arabgol said. In their experiments, Arabgol and Sleator used a commercial spinner turbine to rotate a sample of water up to very high speeds. They also used a non-standard nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machine that is designed to operate at low frequencies. This is in stark contrast with commercial NMR systems, which operate in high frequency. “In our experiment, we were looking for a change in the NMR signal that was inversely proportional to the NMR frequency,” Arabgol said. “So ironically, we wanted a low-frequency NMR apparatus, and we had to design and assemble the parts ourselves. To put this into numbers, we ended up working with an apparatus that was operating in less than 1 MHz, and we started searching for a few (1 to 3) percent change in the signal. If we wanted to use a standard apparatus, we had to search for a change in the signal few orders of magnitude smaller, which is impossible due to the variety of noises.” Journal information: Physical Review Letterslast_img read more

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A Royal Reference

A Royal Reference

first_imgTurn your ordinary life into a royal one. Curious to know how? Well, the answer is Live Life Like a Maharaja- How to Turn Your Home Into A Palace, a book written by Amrita Gandhi. The book was launced on 11 April at The Imperial where Maharani Kumud Kumari of Gondal unveiled it. In the book, Gandhi has revealed some treasure trove of royal lifestyle tips and secrets that will change the way of living. Full of great advice on how to create luxury out of the ordinary, this book is a journey into the lives and homes of India’s royal families, revealing the prized lifestyle secrets that will make kings and queens of all of us.The evening saw the presence of Maharani Kumud Kumari of Gondal, Maharaja Jyotindra Singh of Gondal, Maharaja Gajsingh of Jodhpur, Adil Ahmed, Narjis Abedi and Naghat Abedi of Rampur, Anjolie Ela Menon, Rajyashree Kumari of Bikaner and Raghavendra Rathore.last_img read more

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More buses to ply in Behala

More buses to ply in Behala

first_imgKolkata: State Transport minister Suvendu Adhikari took stringent measures to check “atrocities” of a section of auto-rickshaw drivers in Behala along with announcing the launch of more buses in the area. The steps have been taken to ensure that people of Behala do not face any inconvenience in the absence of the Majerhat bridge. Adhikari held a meeting on Wednesday and set up an eight-member committee comprising representatives of auto-rickshaw unions, local councilors, traffic cops and Officer-in-Charge of the local police station. The committee members will ensure that no auto-rickshaw drivers charge fare arbitrarily. Moreover, additional 80 buses will be made operational in phases on different routes including M15, 3A, 4C, C8, M16 and M17.last_img

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KMC identifies four city markets in shambles

KMC identifies four city markets in shambles

first_imgKolkata: The Market department of Kolkata Municipal Corporation has found four markets owned by individual or joint owners in the city in wretched condition, two of them with poor firefighting mechanism.A team has been formed with officials of the department, Kolkata Police, CESC and Fire Services department, after the fire incident at Bagree market in Burrabazar on September 16. The team has been given the responsibility to examine the condition of not only the municipal markets but also those owned by individual owners. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe first visit of the team was at Entally Market in October and following this, the team had visited four markets by individual owners – the Harisaha Market near Khanna Cinema in North Kolkata, the Srimani Market at Amherst Street, AC market at Shakespeare Sarani and Treasure Island in Esplanade. A senior official of KMC’s Market department, on condition of anonymity, said that Harisaha Market is in extremely poor condition. “This market is open only during weekends, at the ground floor of the four-storeyed building. The roof of the building is also occupied by sellers. Around 20,000 people visit Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedthis market and so, if the roof collapses, it may lead to a disaster and loss of lives. The market building that mainly houses garment shops, is in urgent need of repair,” the official said. The KMC has served the notice of dangerous building some time ago but the owner has remained indifferent. There is a single fire extinguisher in the market and no water source. The entry and exit routes are extremely narrow and the traders lay their wares blocking space for movement. The road leading to the market is also narrow, posing difficulty to fire tenders if there is a fire incident. The condition of Srimani Market is no better but there is available space for movement of fire engines. The owners of both these markets have been cautioned and asked to take steps for repair. The AC Market at Shakespeare Sarani and Treasure Island are crammed for space and the entry and exit routes are often blocked by goods for sale. “The firefighting mechanism of these markets have been found to be satisfactory. The authorities have been asked to take measures to free space for movement,” the official added. The final report of the five markets will be prepared by the civic body after they receive the report from the police and Fire department and then submitted to the state government. There are around 358 markets in the city that include municipal ones and those owned by individual or joint owners. More such drives will be held after Jagadhatri Puja, with the target to cover all these markets.last_img read more

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