Month: July 2019

Good Morning Mission to the Houses on a Hill

Good Morning Mission to the Houses on a Hill

first_imgOne of the extraordinary house son the hill. Photo by Lydia ChávezAt the corner of Utah and Mariposa. Photo by Lydia ChávezYes, a rooftop deck. Photo by Lydia ChávezCentury plants. Photo by Lydia ChávezOn Mariposa. Photo by Lydia ChávezThe end, but wait. Photo by Lydia ChávezIt gets better with this lovely park. Photo by Lydia ChávezAnd path. Photo by Lydia Chávez 0% Right now it is 57° with a high of 68° – the forecast for the next ten days is here.Today’s block:  18th to Mariposa, Utah to the freeway/SanBurno.This is another wedge block, but one with the most amazing houses built high up on the hill that make you feel as if you must be in Maine and looking out to the Atlantic.  Does anyone know anything about the houses?You can see a map of all of the blocks here. The blocks in grey are being saved for others who have signed up. Let us save a block for you as well.center_img Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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Why the San Francisco International Film Fest Moved to the Mission

Why the San Francisco International Film Fest Moved to the Mission

first_img Tags: film festivals • films • New Mission Theater • Roxie • things to do Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% 0% The San Francisco International Film Festival kicks off tonight at the Castro Theater, but after the opening, the majority of the festival’s will be held in the Mission District for the first time ever. Mission Local spoke with SFIFF Executive Director Noah Cowan about the transition and what it will change.Mission Local: Was there a moment when someone said, hey, we should do this in the Mission?Noah Cowan: We are a city based film festival, and that means that we are also ambassadors for this place.When I arrived here [from Toronto] nothing really rivaled the Mission in terms of the brilliance of its history and its existing culture on the one and, and …on the other, the incredible changes that that have occurred there. center_img To me, this neighborhood really represents San Francisco in transition. That, I think, is going to be of most interest to our dozens and dozens of visitors, hundreds of visitors from out of town, as they start seeing what’s been great about San Francisco and some of what’s been lost in San Francisco, and what’s new in the city.We’re working really diligently to embrace both the old and the new in the mission and we have a lot of different kinds of partnerships in order to do that.Without a doubt with neighborhood is among the most vibrant, interesting and contested on the planet. Festivals are all about beginning conversation and dialogue. And so what better place to do that than the Mission?We can create a really marvelous festival village between 16th and 24th streets in the Mission and we’re really proud of that. We’re really proud we’re helping to upgrade existing facilities in the neighborhood as well as the new arrivals, the Alamo Drafthouse.ML:You mentioned uprgading. What are some changes and upgrades you contributed?NC: The Victoria has done great work in terms of encouraging live theater in that space. We purchased a projector to make the experience better in the Victoria. We’re always just doing what would appear to be minor changes but actually enhance the audience’s experience in all of our work.For example, in a sponsorship with Dolby,  which is among the best, and started as a San Francisco based company…[Consultants] walk into a cinema figure out how to recalibrate the sound and how it’s going to be more effective with things like speaker placement, etc. Visiting filmmakers really appreciate that because their films sound and look great.ML: With this “film village,” do you see yourself as reviving Mission street as cinema thoroughfare?NC: My understanding is that for most of its history until really recently, the Mission area was packed with films, so it was just a great place to see a movie and was a really important moviegoing capitol of the city.If we can play a part in reviving that and making that a reality once again that’d make us really proud, and I think we’re on the way. We’re having a great time understanding the history and culture of the place we’re going into right now.Part of that is seeing photos of Mission Street full of really fabulous movie palaces. It’s great to feel like we’re playing some small role in bringing that back. ML: What does having these different types of facilities allow you to do?NC: Gray area still feels very much part of the family this year, and has new technology. For us it’s an obvious match for readers who don’t know what Gray Area is. It’s one of the preeminent  digital arts facilities in the country. It feels very forward thinking. We’re really happy that they wanted us.We’re going to be doing some events there and a lot of the arts stuff – we couldn’t have asked for a better place for that.When we talk about a village I think what we talk about is somewhat organic. The Mission has a long history of welcoming people and we think this will be no different.The fact that we have so many theaters and opportunities for engagement…plus we’re going to have lots of filmmakers and people from out of town industry I think there’s going to be this wonderful spontaneous film community. It’s a place within the world that feels really open to conversation and dialogue and we’re hoping we can add to that by bringing in these terrific filmmakers from around the planet. ML: Does this allow you to do something that a different setup might not allow?NC: The move has also provided us the opportunity to kind of make the festival a little bit more festive. We’re able to serve drinks in all of our theaters, a couple have food, it allows it to become a bit of a bigger experience, a more wholesome experience.We’ll see how it all plays out of course, but for now, in many ways, this is going to be a pilot year for us to see how it goes. What we’re going to get out of the experience, what the audience will get out of the experience, and what the neighborhood will get out of the experience. And we’ll reassess next year and make it even better.You can see a full schedule of SFIFF screenings and events here last_img read more

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THE boot of Danny Tickle handed Saints a 2210 rev

first_imgTHE boot of Danny Tickle handed Saints a 22-10 reverse as Hull FC came from behind to win at Langtree Park.Saints looked set fair early in the second half as Tony Puletua twisted and turned to put them ahead.But poor discipline handed Hull the impetus and they ran out deserved winners.A tight tussle was tied 4-4 at half time after tries from Ade Gardner and Wade McKinnon.Both sides were guilty of errors and poor handling but would have been happy with their defensive stints.In the second half, Jordan Turner cancelled out Tony Puletua’s early try before Danny Tickle notched up three penalties in a row.Wade McKinnon adding a late score to compound Saints misery – and their third defeat in a row.Peter Gentle made one change from the team that beat Wakefield 14-10 last week with Richard Whiting coming off the bench in place of Martin Aspinwall.For Saints, Paul Clough slotted in at loose forward with both Jamie Foster and Josh Perry recalled. Lance Hohaia replaced the injured James Roby.Royce Simmons’ men were looking to avoid their third defeat in a row and would have been looking for the best possible start.So to be on the back foot straight from the kick off wasn’t the ideal way to get the game underway.Hull’s kick off bounced straight past Lee Gaskell and Tony Puletua for a drop out and then they won a repeat set.But Saints quickly regained possession and then forced a one of their own.Hull thought they’d scored when Kirk Yeaman squeezed through a gap and went down just before the line.And his momentum seemingly took him over but the referee didn’t allow it.After a real battle in midfield, it was Saints who took the lead first.They pushed up the field and a sweeping move saw Ade Gardner cross for his 164th in the Red Vee right in the corner.Foster pushing his conversion slightly wide.But on 30 minutes Wade McKinnon got the better of Saints’ left hand side and levelled up.Like Foster, Danny Tickle pushed his kick wide.Saints delayed their entry to the second half to get us much out of the break as they could.And it seemed to work as they defended well and then popped up with a big score from Tony Puletua.Saints had a move planned out wide, but the big man was having none of it and twisted out of a tackle to plunge over.Foster making it 10-4.The home side could have stretched out further when Lee Gaskell improvised a kick to Michael Shenton causing the Hull defence to scramble.But Saints lost the ball on their attack from the drop out; Paul Wellens unluckily not taking in a fine Josh Perry offload.From there Jordan Turner picked up to race 80 yards after a couple of neat passes.Tickle converted from out wide and then punished an indiscretion with a coolly taken penalty.He notched up another with 10 minutes left.Tickle then punished yet another Saints’ indiscretion and Wade McKinnon closed the deal with a scoot from close in after Saints were penalised once again.Match Summary:Saints:Tries: Gardner, PuletuaGoals: Foster (1 for 2)Hull FC:Tries: McKinnon, Turner, McKinnonGoals: Tickle (5 from 6)Penalties:Saints: 9Hull FC: 9HT: 4-4FT: 10-22REF: Ben ThalerATT: 14875Teams:Saints:1. Paul Wellens; 2. Ade Gardner, 3. Michael Shenton, 5. Francis Meli, 22. Jamie Foster; 20. Lee Gaskell, 7. Jonny Lomax; 14. Anthony Laffranchi, 6. Lance Hohaia, 11. Tony Puletua, 12. Jon Wilkin, 4. Sia Soliola, 16. Paul Clough.Subs: 8. Josh Perry, 10. Louie McCarthy Scarsbrook, 17. Gary Wheeler, 19. Andrew Dixon.Hull FC:1. Wade McKinnon; 2. Will Sharp, 3. Tony Martin, 4. Kirk Yeaman, 5. Tom Briscoe; 6. Richard Horne, 7. Brett Seymour; 8. Mark O’Meley, 9. Danny Houghton, 10. Andy Lynch, 11. Willie Manu, 12. Danny Tickle, 15. Richard Whiting.Subs: 16. Eamon O’Carroll, 17. Sam Moa, 19. Jordan Turner, 20. Jamie Ellis.A short audio match report of this game can be downloaded here.This is available for all radio and online radio stations to downloadlast_img read more

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The players were put through their paces at the To

The players were put through their paces at the To

first_imgThe players were put through their paces at the Totally Wicked Stadium in preparation for the 2pm kick-off tomorrow (Sat 19 Jan) for Jonny Lomax’s Testimonial.Tickets are still available to purchase from the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium, by calling 01744 455052 or clicking here.Tickets are also available on the gate with Adult prcies from £11 and 16s and under priced at £6.last_img

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ONLY ON WWAY Family speaks about mom accused of trying to drown

ONLY ON WWAY Family speaks about mom accused of trying to drown

first_imgPENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — The woman accused of trying to drown her four children had her first court appearance in Pender County today.It was an emotional time for both Aeisha Milton and her family.- Advertisement – “Do I regret calling the police? I don’t regret calling nobody. I just needed help. I needed help,” Milton’s mother Geraldine Williams said.A call no mother wants to make.“When this happened it was kind of shocking to me, because when a parent see her child acting out of the ordinary, I jumped, ya know?” Williams said.Related Article: FIRST ON 3: Former Brunswick County magistrate arrested on drug chargesWilliams called 911 on her daughter and said Milton tried to drown her four children ranging in age from 10 months to 3 years old in the bath tub. Williams said she does not regret calling, but some other family members, including Milton’s dad, think Williams was overreacting.“I hope she say and realize she did kinda overreacted, and I hope and pray that she do say that, because my daughter, all I can tell you is my daughter loves her children,” Milton’s father James Milton said.Aeisha Milton is charged with four counts of attempted first-degree murder.Despite that, her mom is standing by her claims.“I could be the one to put a nail in her coffin, and I don’t want to do that to my child, ya know? I had to go back, retrack what happened. I’m not saying I’m wrong for calling the police, ’cause I’d call the police on you, ya know? At this point that’s my child, and I love her to death, and she never did anything like that in her life,” Williams said.Milton’s mother said that her daughter was not herself that night and was on pills.“If you take eight Percocet pills and it’s in your system you have no control over nothing,” Williams said.The judge placed Milton under a $1 million bond.There will be a hearing on November 17 to determine where her four children will be placed.Milton asked for a home study to be done at the homes of two of her sisters so they could take the children.last_img read more

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Salvation Army prepares for Thanksgiving lunch

Salvation Army prepares for Thanksgiving lunch

first_img The Salvation Army will be serving a Thanksgiving lunch Thursday at 1 p.m. at their location on 820 North Second Street in Wilmington.Anyone who is hungry or doesn’t have a family to spend the holiday with is welcome to attend the free event.The food preparations began Wednesday night with volunteers from Boy Scout Troop #212.Related Article: Join WWAY for annual One-Day Blitz to help restock Salvation Army’s food pantry“Being uplifting has great value to it,” Major Mark Craddock, a Salvation Army of Wilmington Corps Officer, said. “That’s how we build community, and so the lessons these kids are learning are giving back, building community and being uplifting.”Major Craddock said he hopes people attending the lunch event find company and learn that there are people in the Wilmington community who care about them.He added that if others want to get involved, he encourages donating food — not just during Thanksgiving, but throughout the year.For more information about the Salvation Army of Wilmington, click here. Volunteers from a local Boy Scout troop prepare a Thanksgiving meal at the Salvation Army (Photo: Kirsten Gutierrez/WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Many people around the Cape Fear spent their Wednesday night giving back to the community by preparing meals for Thanksgiving.Volunteers from a local Boy Scout troop came out to the Salvation Army in Wilmington to prepare for the big day.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Enjoy music gyros baklava and more at the annual St Nicholas Greek

Enjoy music gyros baklava and more at the annual St Nicholas Greek

first_img Festival hours are May 18 and 19 from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and May 20 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. There is a one-time fee of $3 or you can use the drive-through option to just pick up food and desserts.Church tours are also available during the festival. For more details on them and other festival events, click here.The festival started in 1992. According to its website, around 15,000 people attend every year. Proceeds benefit the church and local charities. NEW HANOVER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — It’s that time of year again! The St. Nicholas Greek Festival is back with fun for the whole family.Friday through Sunday, May 18-20, enjoy traditional Greek music, dancing, food and more. Festival spokesman Basile said preparations are underway all week to get ready to feed the large crowds.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Not the place to cut funding Teachers rally over education needs

Not the place to cut funding Teachers rally over education needs

first_img Teacher rally in Raleigh on May 16, 2018. (Photo: WWAY) “I just hope they will wake up and realize that, you know, they can’t cut here,” Christian Rothwell, retired teacher, said. “This is not the place to cut funding. Not at schools, not for teachers, especially not for our children.”The Rally for Respect wrapped up with Governor Roy Cooper talking about the budget for teachers.He wants to increase teacher pay and get the much needed supplies in the classroom so teachers don’t have to pay out of pocket. Teacher rally in Raleigh on May 16, 2018. (Photo: WWAY) Teacher rally in Raleigh on May 16, 2018. (Photo: WWAY) RALEIGH, NC (WWAY) — Thousands fighting for students, schools, and the future of education. That’s what has been going on in the state’s capitol Wednesday.From increased teacher pay to more supplies for the classroom and students, those are just a few hot button items more than 20,000 educators and supporters want to see changed in the school system.- Advertisement – Teachers from across North Carolina rally in Raleigh on May 16, 2018. (Photo: WWAY) Teacher rally in Raleigh on May 16, 2018. (Photo: WWAY)center_img Related Article: Teacher of the Week brings out musical side of students“I really hope that the legislatures vote the right way, they vote to help our classrooms, our students that are in our counties across the state. That’s really what we want,” Town Creek Elementary School teacher Callan Sibson said.The whole movement kicked off this morning with the march for students followed by meetings with lawmakers and the rally for respect.Four teachers of the year from Brunswick County sat down with representatives Frank Iler and Deb Bulter, the two from different political parties but both respect the teachers right to rally.“I think it’s just generally what they have to deal with as far as resources, as far as children with issues,” Rep. Iler said. “I think we’re addressing that to some degree in school safety by acknowledging we need to increase the counselors, psychologists and things like that. Teacher pay is always on their minds but we got a 6.2% raise in the budget.”“I said listen ‘how many of you work a second job to provide for your families?’ And all 4 hands went up,” Rep. Bulter said. “So that’s all I need to know that tells me that we’re not respecting and honoring teachers the way that they should. And that’s why they’re here. If, you know, my republican colleagues will say ‘well we’ve given them raises.’ But you can’t steal $1,000 from somebody, give them $800 back and try to convince them you’re doing them a service.”Organizers say today is no the end for this movement adding the educators have the power to change their future come November.“It’s encouraging, I think our education system has been eroded,” Michael Whitley, Durham Middle School teacher said. “It’s nice to see all the teachers come together and make a statement because there are a lot of us, and i think there are a lot of us that are frustrated with what the legislature is doing these days.”Teachers say they hope lawmakers wake up and prioritize the true needs of those education the future generations.A full wrap of the rally tonight on WWAY News at 11. Teacher rally in Raleigh on May 16, 2018. (Photo: WWAY) Teacher rally in Raleigh on May 16, 2018. (Photo: WWAY) Teacher rally in Raleigh on May 16, 2018. (Photo: WWAY) 1 of 8last_img read more

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Logistics firm to set up shop in Pender County

Logistics firm to set up shop in Pender County

first_img It has signed a lease for 100,000 square feet of the complex.“The move further fuels the region’s emergence as the ideal location for mid-Atlantic distribution and trade-related operations,” Scott Satterfield of Wilmington Business Development said in a news release.The Cape Fear Industrial Complex is an 80-acre property, which also has barge access to the Cape Fear River. The logistics firm has signed a lease for 100,000 square feet of the complex. (Photo: BlueArrowWH.com) PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — BlueArrow Warehousing and Logistics is coming to the Cape Fear Industrial Complex in Rocky Point and hiring up to 25 workers.The company provides warehousing, distribution, transportation, pick-and-pack and logistics services for numerous “big box” retailers and e-commerce companies.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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NC grandfather gives granddaughter a prize that will last a lifetime

NC grandfather gives granddaughter a prize that will last a lifetime

first_img “I knew if I ever won anything big, I would share it,” said Beckage. “I’m happy with the little wins, and I’m so happy this is a gift I can give to her.”Thomas, who will soon be attending UNC-Wilmington, plans to use her grandfather’s gift to pay for tuition, books and food as she studies to become an elementary school teacher.“To be able to focus on something I’m passionate about thanks to my grandpa is an amazing gift,” said Thomas.  “I’ve always dreamed of being a Catholic school teacher and helping people. This money makes it possible for me.”Related Article: University breaks ground on new student housingBeckage stayed up late Monday night to check the drawing. “When I got all five, I couldn’t believe it,” he said. “I had a hard time getting back to sleep I was so excited.”The next morning at church, Beckage couldn’t focus on his prayers. He texted his daughter about his win and what he planned to do with the prize. They then waited together for his granddaughter to come home from volunteering.“Kelly, how would you like to have $25,000 a year for the rest of your life?” said Beckage as he greeted his granddaughter.“Oh my gosh Grandpa, did you win the lottery?” said Thomas.Thomas and her grandfather claimed her prize at lottery headquarters in Raleigh on Wednesday. Winners are guaranteed $25,000 a year for life and have the option of taking a lump sum of $390,000. Thomas chose the annuity and received her first annual payment. After federal and state tax withholdings, she took home $17,688.Lucky for Life has 10 ways to win a prize playing the game. This winning ticket beat the odds of one to 1.8 million to match all five white balls and win $25,000 A Year for Life. The top prize is $1,000 A Day for Life.Ticket sales from games like Lucky for Life made it possible for the lottery to raise more than $650 million a year for education. To learn how $9.6 million in lottery funds made a difference in Davidson County last year, click on the “Impact” section of the lottery’s website. Peter Beckage and Kelly Thomas wins lottery prize. (Photo: NC Education Lottery) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Kelly Thomas, 22, got the gift of a lifetime – $25,000 a year for life, for the rest of her life –  from her grandfather, Peter Beckage after he bought a winning Lucky for Life ticket.Beckage, 85, who recently moved in with his daughter to be close to family, says Lucky for Life is one of his go-to games. He bought the winning ticket at Carlton’s Hampton Road Grocery in Clemmons on April 14th, after a Palm Sunday breakfast of pancakes with his granddaughter.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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