New club leads recycling initiatives at SMC

first_imgIn anticipation of the Global Climate Strike, final documents were drafted to establish a new Eco Belles club on Wednesday, which aims to encourage Belles to make sustainable choices and lead recycling and other sustainability initiatives on campus.Rebecca Klaybor, a Saint Mary’s junior and president of Eco Belles, said she was inspired to start the club after she took a costume shop class taught last semester by Melissa Bialko, professional specialist in costume design in the SMC Program of Theater and now faculty advisory for Eco Belles.“This class discussed ethics in the fashion industry so that’s what sparked my true interest in the environment along with climate change complications,” Klaybor said.Saint Mary’s junior and Eco Belles vice president Emily Emerson said she noticed a lack of sustainability clubs on campus and wanted to change that.Emerson, Klaybor and Bialko began to work together last year to develop sustainability initiatives for the Saint Mary’s community, which eventually culminated in the founding of Eco Belles.“We’re working with a group called TerraCycle,” Emerson said. “They have a whole bunch of free recycling programs, and eventually we would like to be able to use their boxes, where you can put anything besides food waste in and they will figure out a way to recycle it for you.”She said though the program is great, buying and shipping boxes is expensive and they are trying to raise the money to participate in the box program. However, other recycling initiatives led by the group are already active on campus.“We’re also currently working with Nike and H&M,” Emerson said. “Nike will take any kind of shoes in any condition and make them into different clothes, new shoes and even basketball courts. H&M recycles fabrics and is working with the theater department because we use a lot of different fabrics and we have a lot of scraps.”TerraCycle has multiple different recycling programs that Eco Belles are participating in, she said, including programs to recycle used Brita filters, contact lenses, razors, oral hygiene, clean makeup products, personal products and the packaging in which all of these items are sold.“You don’t really think about [the waste] until you see that there are ways you can recycle [these products] instead of just throwing them in the garbage,” Emerson said. “I hope this makes the campus much more sustainability-minded and recognize where things are being just thrown in the trash when they don’t need to be. And just being more conscious of how much waste we produce as a campus is huge. This is a necessary step to take as a school, because it can be broadened across the tri-campus community and to other colleges across Indiana.”The main way that Saint Mary’s students can get involved, Klaybor said, is to start collecting items to donate and recycle. On campus, there are bins outside of the costume shop where students can bring donations or recyclable items. Eco Belles will then organize and send that collection to the proper place.Eco Belles meetings are every other Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the Saint Mary’s costume shop in Moreau. Klaybor invites everyone to bring their own mugs for coffee and tea, as well as whatever donations and recycling they may have.“I hope that people will learn that being eco-friendly is easier than what people think,” Klaybor said. “People just need to be taught how easy it is to recycle throughout their day. I hope that campus can learn that being eco-friendly isn’t that difficult, and there are small things that can make a big difference in the long run.”Tags: Eco Belles, SMC Program of Theaterlast_img read more

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COVID: U.S. Supply Of Remdesivir To Run Out At End Of June

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: Mr Hyde at Czech / WikipediaWASHINGTON – The United States is running out of the only drug known to help with COVID-19.According to a doctor with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the last shipment of Remdesivir goes out June 29.The company that makes it is ramping up production, and hopes to have more this summer.A study shows Remdesivir reduces the numbers of days Coronavirus patients spend in the hospital. last_img

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New Law Blocks Housing Providers From Support Animal Discrimination

first_imgCrjs452 / Wikipedia / CC BY-SA 3.0 ALBANY – A new law in New York State now prohibits housing providers from discriminating against a person who relies on an animal for help alleviating the symptoms or effects of a disability.According to the Governor’s Office, housing providers must now provide reasonable accommodation by permitting a support animal to live in a home that otherwise would have prohibited pets.“New Yorkers have zero tolerance for discrimination of any type and this measure will protect some of the most vulnerable among us who require a support animal to help function in their daily lives,” Governor Cuomo said.However, the language of the bill does not make a clearly identify what kind of animal training or services are covered. According to the National Service Animal Registry and the Disability Rights Section of the Department of Justice, “support animal” and “service animal” are distinct categories:“A service dog is specially trained to perform a function or job for an owner that has a physical, intellectual, or emotional disability. An emotional support animal serves as more of a companion for the owner. A service dog may still be able to provide the comfort of an emotional support animal, but it has been trained to complete tasks that a support dog will not.”“Because [emotional support animals] have not been trained to perform a specific job or task, they do not qualify as service animals under the ADA,” the DOJ says. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Norm Lewis & Sierra Boggess to Headline Phantom on Broadway

first_img from $29.00 Related Shows Tony nominee Norm Lewis is set to make history when he takes on the title role in The Phantom of the Opera, becoming the first African-American actor to play the role on Broadway. Lewis will star opposite Sierra Boggess, in her return to the New York production. The two stars, who previously played underwater father and daughter in The Little Mermaid on Broadway, will both begin performances on May 12, replacing Hugh Panaro and Mary Michael Patterson, respectively.Lewis has named The Phantom as his dream role for years. “That’s one of my roles that I always wanted to play,” Lewis told Broadway.com’s Paul Wontorek on Show People, “and it’s really now to set a precedent. It doesn’t even have to be me, but there’s never been an African American to play that role except Robert Guillaume, but never one on Broadway.” [In 1990, Tony nominee Guillaume played the role when he succeeded original star Michael Crawford in the L.A. production.] “Out of 25 years [on Broadway], I’d love to see an African American play that.””I am so honored and giddy with excitement to bring Christine to life again opposite my dearest Norm,” said Boggess, who was recently praised by Phantom composer Andrew Lloyd Webber as “the best Christine.” Boggess added, “This is a moment in time I don’t want to miss!” When asked about playing The Phantom opposite his former onstage daughter, Lewis told Broadway.com, “I’m not going to say the word, but it would add an extra element to that role.”Lewis, who received a Tony nomination for Porgy and Bess, has also appeared on Broadway in Miss Saigon, The Who’s Tommy, Chicago, Side Show, The Wild Party, Amour, Les Miserables, Sondheim on Sondheim and The Little Mermaid. His film and TV credits include Scandal, All My Children and Les Miserables in Concert: The 25th Anniversary. Boggess won the 2013 Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for Favorite Replacement for playing Christine on Broadway, a role she previously played in Las Vegas and in both the London and New York 25th anniversary productions of the show. She also originated the role in Phantom’s London sequel Love Never Dies, for which she received an Oliver Award nomination. She made her Broadway debut as Ariel in The Little Mermaid (for which she won a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award). Her credits also included Master Class on Broadway and Les Miserables in the West End.The Phantom of the Opera, Broadway’s longest-running show, continues its record-breaking run at the Majestic Theatre. Along with Panaro and Patterson, Phantom currently stars Jeremy Hays as Raoul, Laird Mackintosh as Monsieur Andre, Tim Jerome as Monsieur Firmin, Michele McConnell as Carlotta, Ellen Harvey as Madame Giry, Christian Sebek as Piangi and Deanna Doyle as Meg Giry. Sierra Boggess The Phantom of the Operacenter_img Star Files Norm Lewis View Commentslast_img read more

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Candice Bergen & Alan Alda Become B’way’s Newest Pen Pals in Love Letters

first_imgLove was in the air on November 13, when stage and screen stars Alan Alda and Candice Bergen became the two newest celebrities to step into A.R. Gurney’s Love Letters on Broadway! The moving play features a rotating cast of guest stars, and the pair were thrilled to officially become Broadway pen pals. After the show, Alda and Bergen headed to swanky New York City restaurant Brasserie 8 1/2 to celebrate. Check out this Hot Shot from the exciting evening, then see Alda and Bergen in Love Letters through December 18 at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre! Love Letters Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 14, 2014 View Commentslast_img

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Ask On the Town’s Jay Armstrong Johnson & Alysha Umphress Anything!

first_imgFor just one day, On the Town stars Jay Armstrong Johnson and Alysha Umphress are taking a seat on the comfy grey Broadway.com couch! The pair, who play adorable couple Chip and Hildy in the hit musical revival, will answer anything you’ve wanted to know—like what Umphress is currently rocking out to on her record player or what Johnson’s current junk food obsession is. Submit your questions below, then check back to see the On the Town stars answer them in their very own “Ask a Star” video. View Comments Related Shows <a href=”https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/z18qg6bd1br2cou/” title=”html form”>Fill out my Wufoo form!</a>center_img On the Town Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 6, 2015last_img read more

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Cherry Jones & More Set for Sarah Ruhl’s Dear Elizabeth Off-B’way

first_imgTwo-time Tony winner Cherry Jones, Tony nominee Kathleen Chalfant and more will be members of six rotating casts for the New York premiere of Sarah Ruhl’s Dear Elizabeth. Directed by Kate Whoriskey, the inaugural production of Women’s Project Theater at the McGinn/Cazale Theatre, will play a limited engagement October 26 through December 5.Dear Elizabeth examines the correspondence between Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell—two of the twentieth century’s most renowned poets. The show tells a tale of unconventional friendship and intimacy that spanned thirty years and more than 400 letters, with postmarks from Maine to Key West, from London to South America.The roles of Bishop and Lowell, respectively, will be taken on by, as follows: October 26—31 Chalfant (Angels in America) and Harris Yulin (Hedda Gabler); November 2—7 J. Smith-Cameron (Juno and the Paycock) and John Douglas Thompson (Othello); November 16—21 Jones (Doubt) and David Aaron Baker (Once Upon A Mattress). November 23—28 real-life married couple Ellen McLaughlin (Angels in America) and Rinde Eckert (Slow Fire) will appear in the show and from November 30—December 5 Mia Katigbak (Awake and Sing!) is scheduled to play Bishop. Polly Noonan (Dead Man’s Cell Phone) will play the role of Stage Manager for all six weeks. Additional casting will be announced later.The production will feature set design by Antje Ellermann, costume design by Anita Yavich, lighting design by Mary Louise Geiger, along with sound design by Jill BC Du Boff and Emily Auciello. View Commentslast_img read more

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Brooks Lecture.

first_imgZell Miller In 1983, the awards expanded to include research, extension and county extension programs. An award for international agriculture was added in 1988. Brooks was an advisor on agriculture and trade issues to seven U.S. presidents. He started Cotton States Mutual Insurance Companies in 1941 to provide farmers insurance. The awards include a framed certificate and a $5,000 cash award. Former Gov. Zell Miller will be the featured speaker at the 1999 D.W. Brooks Lecture Oct. 4 at in the Mahler Auditorium in the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. The CAES sponsors the annual lecture series in his memory.center_img The 11 a.m. lecture is named for D.W. Brooks, founder and chairman emeritus of Gold Kist, Inc., who died this summer. Miller’s presentation, “Georgia: Gains and Gaps,” will precede the announcement of the D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence. The annual awards are presented to UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences faculty who excel in teaching, research and extension. The teaching award was established in 1981 to recognize faculty members who make outstanding contributions and maintain excellence in the CAES teaching program. His many honors for contributions to global agriculture included being the first inductee into the UGA Agricultural Hall of Fame. He received the Distinguished Agribusiness Award from the Georgia Agribusiness Council and was named Progressive Farmer magazine’s “Man of the Year in Agriculture in the South.”last_img read more

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2002 D.W. Brooks Lecture

first_imgCarus’ presentation, “Bioterrorism, Homeland Security and the Food Supply,” will be at 11 a.m. in the Georgia Center for Continuing Education’s Mahler Auditorium on the University of Georgia campus.The lecture will precede the announcement of the annual D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence, presented to UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences employees who excel in teaching, research and extension.The teaching award was established in 1981 to recognize faculty members who make outstanding contributions and maintain excellence in the teaching program of the college. In 1983, the program expanded to include awards for research, extension and county extension programs. An award for international agriculture was added in 1988.The Brooks awards include a framed certificate and $5,000 cash.The lecture is named for the late D.W. Brooks, founder and chairman emeritus of Gold Kist, Inc. Brooks was an advisor to seven U.S. presidents on agriculture and trade issues. He started Cotton States Mutual Insurance Companies in 1941 to provide farmers insurance. His many honors for contributions to worldwide agriculture included being the first inductee into the UGA Agricultural Hall of Fame. He received the Distinguished Agribusiness Award from the Georgia Agribusiness Council and was named Progressive Farmer magazine’s “Man of the Year in Agriculture in the South.”The CAES sponsors the annual lecture series in his memory.last_img read more

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Flee fleas

first_imgBy Nancy C. Hinkleand DanRahnUniversity of GeorgiaWhen cat fleas leave their cocoons, they have a week to 10 daysto find a host animal or die. So when they find one, they don’tleave on their own. Feeding on blood, they keep on making troubleand flea babies until they’re kicked out or killed.And cat fleas aren’t just for cats. These common fleas get theirblood meals from people, too, and many other mammals — dogs,raccoons, skunks, even birds. Getting room and board on so manyhosts makes them tenacious pests of both pets and their homes.Their feeding isn’t fun for the hosts. Cat fleas’ bites itch, andpets scratch and bite themselves repeatedly. Puppies and kittenswith lots of fleas can get anemic and even die.Cat fleas don’t carry many diseases. But they can transmit theagents that cause typhus and cat scratch disease. They’reintermediate hosts for dog tapeworms, too, which can affect smallchildren as well as dogs and cats.Flea allergy dermatitisMany dogs and some cats develop flea allergy dermatitis. Forthem, the bites trigger a cascade of symptoms in a misery ofexcessive grooming, hair loss and bare skin with weeping soresthat often lead to secondary infections. And the best way totreat it is to get rid of the fleas.Cat fleas are small, dark, reddish brown, wingless insects withbodies that are flattened side-to-side. They’re covered withbackward-pointing spines that make them hard to pull from a pet’scoat. And their long hind legs are well adapted for jumping.Female fleas mate and start laying eggs within two days.Averaging one an hour, they can lay hundreds of eggs in theseveral weeks they live. And when conditions are right, it takesonly a couple of weeks for the eggs to become adults.Only adults biteThe only good news is that only adult fleas are parasitic. Allother life stages develop off the host.The eggs, about a millimeter long, hatch in two days, or one withideal temperatures. The white, eyeless, legless larvae seldomtravel far, feeding on flea feces, dry blood and other thingsthat collect where pets live. The larvae develop in 10 days to amonth, then spin silk cocoons that look like little dirt clods orlint balls.In the cocoons, the larvae change into pupae and then adults inabout four days. And when the time is right — from less than aday to more than a year — the adult breaks out in itslife-or-death search for a host.Since they have to have blood to survive, treating host animalsis the best way to kill fleas.Flea bustersSeveral products do this well. Many contain pyrethrins, which aresafe and effective but don’t provide residual control. Otherover-the-counter compounds include spot-on permethrin products,which are limited to dogs and can be lethal to cats.Veterinarians can prescribe products that give weeks of controlwith one application. These are applied in small amounts on theback of the pet’s neck and spread over its body in skin oils.Other products come as sprays. These kill fleas on the pet withina few hours and then keep working for weeks.Once pets have been treated, it will take a while for the fleasaround them to die off. As they develop, fleas keep hopping ontothe pet, which keeps “harvesting” them from surrounding areasuntil they’ve been killed.Insect growth regulators can break the flea life cycle. Thesecompounds don’t kill adult fleas. But they do prevent eggs andlarvae from completing their development. So any fleas broughtinto the area won’t build up a sustaining population.Places where pets hang out gather flea eggs and larval food. Sokeep these areas clean and vacuumed, and treat them to preventinfestations and protect pets and people.last_img read more

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